PSEC 2014 10-K
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K
ý
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014
o
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 Commission File Number: 814-00659 
PROSPECT CAPITAL CORPORATION
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)
Maryland
43-2048643
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
10 East 40th Street, 42nd Floor
 
New York, New York
10016
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)
Registrant's telephone number, including area code: (212) 448-0702
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, par value $0.001 per share
NASDAQ Global Select Market
6.95% Senior Notes due 2022
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes o    No ý
Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o    No ý
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý    No o
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes o    No o
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of Registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. o
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer" and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer ý
Accelerated filer o
Non-accelerated filer o
Smaller reporting company o
 (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes o    No ý
The aggregate market value of the common equity held by non-affiliates of the Registrant as of December 31, 2013 was $3.337 billion (based on the closing price on that date of $11.22 on the NASDAQ Global Select Market). For the purposes of calculating this amount only, all executive officers and Directors are "affiliates" of the Registrant.
As of August 22, 2014, there were 342,854,575 shares of the Registrant's common stock outstanding.
Documents Incorporated by Reference
Portions of the Registrant's definitive Proxy Statement relating to the 2014 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, are incorporated by reference in Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K to the extent described therein.




TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
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PART I
In this report, the terms "Prospect Capital Corporation," "we," "us" and "our" refer to Prospect Capital Corporation ("Prospect") and all entities included in our consolidated financial statements; "Prospect Capital Management" or the "Investment Adviser" refers to Prospect Capital Management LLC; "Prospect Administration" or the "Administrator" refers to Prospect Administration LLC.
Our $150.0 million of 6.25% Convertible Senior Notes due 2015 are referred to as the 2015 Notes. Our $167.5 million of 5.50% Convertible Senior Notes due 2016 are referred to as the 2016 Notes. Our $130.0 million of 5.375% Convertible Senior Notes due 2017 are referred to as the 2017 Notes. Our $200.0 million of 5.75% Convertible Senior Notes due 2018 are referred to as the 2018 Notes. Our $200.0 million of 5.875% Convertible Senior Notes due 2019 are referred to as the 2019 Notes. Our $400.0 million of 4.75% Convertible Senior Notes due 2020 are referred to as the 2020 Notes, and collectively with the 2015 Notes, 2016 Notes, 2017 Notes, the 2018 Notes and the 2019 Notes, the Senior Convertible Notes. Our $100.0 million of 6.95% Senior Notes due 2022 are referred to as the 2022 Notes. Our $250.0 million of 5.875% Senior Notes due 2023 are referred to as the 2023 Notes. Our $300.0 million of 5.00% Senior Notes due 2019 are referred to as the 5.00% 2019 Notes, and collectively with the 2022 Notes and the 2023 Notes, the Senior Unsecured Notes. Any Prospect Capital InterNotes® issued pursuant to our medium term notes program are referred to as the Prospect Capital InterNotes®, and together with the Senior Convertible Notes and the Senior Unsecured Notes are referred to as Senior Notes.
Item 1. Business
General
We are a financial services company that primarily lends to and invests in middle market privately-held companies. We are a closed-end investment company incorporated in Maryland. We have elected to be regulated as a business development company ("BDC") under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the "1940 Act"). As a BDC, we have elected to be treated as a regulated investment company ("RIC") under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (the "Internal Revenue Code" or the "Code"). We invest primarily in senior and subordinated debt and equity of companies in need of capital for acquisitions, divestitures, growth, development, recapitalizations and other purposes. We work with the management teams or financial sponsors to seek investments with historical cash flows, asset collateral or contracted pro-forma cash flows.
We currently have nine origination strategies in which we make investments: (1) lending in private equity sponsored transactions, (2) lending directly to companies not owned by private equity firms, (3) control investments in corporate operating companies, (4) control investments in financial companies, (5) investments in structured credit, (6) real estate investments, (7) investments in syndicated debt, (8) aircraft leasing and (9) online lending. We continue to evaluate other origination strategies in the ordinary course of business with no specific tops-down allocation to any single origination strategy.
Lending in Private Equity Sponsored Transactions – We make loans to companies which are controlled by leading private equity firms. This debt can take the form of first lien, second lien, unitranche or unsecured loans. In making these investments, we look for a diversified customer base, recurring demand for the product or service, barriers to entry, strong historical cash flow and experienced management teams. These loans typically have significant equity subordinate to our loan position. Historically, this strategy has comprised approximately 50%-60% of our business, but more recently it is less than 50% of our business.
Lending Directly to Companies – We provide debt financing to companies owned by non-private equity firms, the company founder, a management team or a family. Here, in addition to the strengths we look for in a sponsored transaction, we also look for the alignment with the management team with significant invested capital. This strategy often has less competition than the private equity sponsor strategy because such company financing needs are not easily addressed by banks and often require more diligence preparation. Direct lending can result in higher returns and lower leverage than sponsor transactions and may include warrants or equity to us. Historically, this strategy has comprised approximately 5%-15% of our business, but more recently it is less than 5% of our business.
Control Investments in Corporate Operating Companies – This strategy involves acquiring controlling stakes in non-financial operating companies. Our investments in these companies are generally structured as a combination of yield-producing debt and equity.  We provide certainty of closure to our counterparties, give the seller personal liquidity and generally look for management to continue on in their current roles. This strategy has comprised approximately 10%-15% of our business.
Control Investments in Financial Companies – This strategy involves acquiring controlling stakes in financial companies, including consumer direct lending, sub-prime auto lending and other strategies. Our investments in these companies are generally structured as a combination of yield-producing debt and equity. These investments are often structured in a tax-efficient RIC-compliant partnership, enhancing returns. This strategy has comprised approximately 5%-15% of our business.

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Investments in Structured Credit – We make investments in collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”), generally taking a significant position in the subordinated interests (equity) of the CLOs. The CLOs include a diversified portfolio of broadly syndicated loans and do not have direct exposure to real estate, mortgages, sub-prime debt, or consumer based debt. The CLOs in which we invest are managed by top-tier collateral managers that have been thoroughly diligenced prior to investment. This strategy has comprised approximately 10%-20% of our business.
Real Estate Investments – We make investments in real estate through our three wholly-owned tax-efficient real estate investment trusts ("REITs"), American Property REIT Corp., National Property REIT Corp. and United Property REIT Corp. (collectively, "our REITs"). Our real estate investments are in various classes of fully developed and occupied real estate properties that generate current yields. We seek to identify properties that have historically high occupancy and steady cash flow generation. Our REITs partner with established property managers with experience in managing the property type to manage such properties after acquisition. This is a more recent investment strategy that has comprised approximately 5%-10% of our business.
Investments in Syndicated Debt – On an opportunistic basis, we make investments in loans and high yield bonds that have been sold to a syndicate of buyers. Here we look for investments with attractive risk-adjusted returns after we have completed a fundamental credit analysis. These investments are purchased with a long term, buy-and-hold outlook and we look to provide significant structuring input by providing anchoring orders. This strategy has comprised approximately 5%-10% of our business.
Aircraft Leasing – We invest debt as well as equity in aircraft assets subject to commercial leases to credit-worthy airlines across the globe. These investments present attractive return opportunities due to cash flow consistency from long-lived assets coupled with hard asset collateral. We seek to deliver risk-adjusted returns with strong downside protection by analyzing relative value characteristics across the spectrum of aircraft types of all vintages. Our target portfolio includes both in-production and out-of-production jet and turboprop aircraft and engines, operated by airlines across the globe. This strategy comprised approximately 1.5% of our business in the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014.
Online Lending – We make investments in loans originated by certain consumer loan and small and medium sized business (“SME”) originators. We purchase each loan in its entirety (i.e., a “whole loan”). The borrowers are consumers and SMEs. The loans are typically serviced by the originators of the loans. This strategy comprised approximately 1% of our business in the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014.
Typically, we concentrate on making investments in companies with annual revenues of less than $750 million and enterprise values of less than $1 billion. Our typical investment involves a secured loan of less than $250 million. We also acquire controlling interests in companies in conjunction with making secured debt investments in such companies. In most cases, companies in which we invest are privately held at the time we invest in them. We refer to these companies as "target" or "middle market" companies and these investments as "middle market investments."
We seek to maximize total returns to our investors, including both current yield and equity upside, by applying rigorous credit analysis and asset-based and cash-flow based lending techniques to make and monitor our investments. We are constantly pursuing multiple investment opportunities, including purchases of portfolios from private and public companies, as well as originations and secondary purchases of particular securities. We also regularly evaluate control investment opportunities in a range of industries, and some of these investments could be material to us. There can be no assurance that we will successfully consummate any investment opportunity we are currently pursuing. If any of these opportunities are consummated, there can be no assurance that investors will share our view of valuation or that any assets acquired will not be subject to future write downs, each of which could have an adverse effect on our stock price.
We have been organized as a closed-end investment company since April 13, 2004 and have filed an election to be treated as a business development company under the 1940 Act. We are a non-diversified company within the meaning of the 1940 Act. Our headquarters are located at 10 East 40th Street, 42nd Floor, New York, NY 10016, and our telephone number is (212) 448-0702. Our investment adviser is Prospect Capital Management LLC.
Our Investment Objective and Policies
Our investment objective is to generate both current income and long-term capital appreciation through debt and equity investments. We focus on making investments in private companies. We are a non-diversified company within the meaning of the 1940 Act.

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We invest primarily in first and second lien secured loans and unsecured debt, which in some cases includes an equity component. First and second lien secured loans generally are senior debt instruments that rank ahead of unsecured debt of a given portfolio company. These loans also have the benefit of security interests on the assets of the portfolio company, which may rank ahead of or be junior to other security interests. Our investments in CLOs are subordinated to senior loans and are generally unsecured. We invest in debt and equity positions of CLOs which are a form of securitization in which the cash flows of a portfolio of loans are pooled and passed on to different classes of owners in various tranches. Our CLO investments are derived from portfolios of corporate debt securities which are generally risk rated from BB to B. Our investments have generally ranged between $5 million and $250 million each, although the investment size may be more or less than this range. Our investment sizes are expected to grow as our capital base expands.
We also acquire controlling interests in companies in conjunction with making secured debt investments in such companies. These may be in several industries, including industrial, service, real estate and financial businesses.
We seek to maximize returns and minimize risk for our investors by applying rigorous analysis to make and monitor our investments. While the structure of our investments varies, we can invest in senior secured debt, senior unsecured debt, subordinated secured debt, subordinated unsecured debt, convertible debt, convertible preferred equity, preferred equity, common equity, warrants and other instruments, many of which generate current yield. While our primary focus is to seek current income through investment in the debt and/or dividend-paying equity securities of eligible privately-held, thinly-traded or distressed companies and long-term capital appreciation by acquiring accompanying warrants, options or other equity securities of such companies, we may invest up to 30% of the portfolio in opportunistic investments in order to seek enhanced returns for stockholders. Such investments may include investments in the debt and equity instruments of broadly-traded public companies. We expect that these public companies generally will have debt securities that are non-investment grade. Such investments may also include purchases (either in the primary or secondary markets) of the equity and junior debt tranches of a type of such pools known as CLOs. Structurally, CLOs are entities that are formed to hold a portfolio of senior secured loans made to companies whose debt is rated below investment grade or, in limited circumstances, unrated. The senior secured loans within a CLO are limited to senior secured loans which meet specified credit and diversity criteria and are subject to concentration limitations in order to create an investment portfolio that is diverse by senior secured loan, borrower, and industry, with limitations on non-U.S. borrowers. Within this 30% basket, we have and may make additional investments in debt and equity securities of financial companies and companies located outside of the United States.
Our investments may include other equity investments, such as warrants, options to buy a minority interest in a portfolio company, or contractual payment rights or rights to receive a proportional interest in the operating cash flow or net income of such company. When determined by the Investment Adviser to be in our best interest, we may acquire a controlling interest in a portfolio company. Any warrants we receive with our debt securities may require only a nominal cost to exercise, and thus, as a portfolio company appreciates in value, we may achieve additional investment return from this equity interest. We have structured, and will continue to structure, some warrants to include provisions protecting our rights as a minority-interest or, if applicable, controlling-interest holder, as well as puts, or rights to sell such securities back to the company, upon the occurrence of specified events. In many cases, we obtain registration rights in connection with these equity interests, which may include demand and "piggyback" registration rights.
We plan to hold many of our debt investments to maturity or repayment, but will sell a debt investment earlier if a liquidity event takes place, such as the sale or recapitalization of a portfolio company, or if we determine a sale of such debt investment to be in our best interest.
We have qualified and elected to be treated for U.S. federal income tax purposes as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code. As a RIC, we generally do not have to pay corporate-level U.S. federal income taxes on any ordinary income or capital gains that we distribute to our stockholders as dividends. To continue to qualify as a RIC, we must, among other things, meet certain source-of-income and asset diversification requirements (as described below). In addition, to qualify for RIC tax treatment, we must distribute to our stockholders, for each taxable year, at least 90% of our "investment company taxable income," which is generally our ordinary income plus the excess of our realized net short-term capital gains over our realized net long-term capital losses.
For a discussion of the risks inherent in our portfolio investments, see "Risk Factors – Risks Relating to Our Investments."
Industry Sectors
Our portfolio is invested across 30 industry categories. Excluding our CLO investments, which do not have industry concentrations, no individual industry comprises more than 9.8% of the portfolio on either a cost or fair value basis.

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Ongoing Relationships with Portfolio Companies
Monitoring
Prospect Capital Management monitors our portfolio companies on an ongoing basis. Prospect Capital Management will continue to monitor the financial trends of each portfolio company to determine if it is meeting its business plan and to assess the appropriate course of action for each company.
Prospect Capital Management employs several methods of evaluating and monitoring the performance and value of our investments, which may include, but are not limited to, the following:
Assessment of success in adhering to the portfolio company's business plan and compliance with covenants;
Regular contact with portfolio company management and, if appropriate, the financial or strategic sponsor to discuss financial position, requirements and accomplishments;
Comparisons to other portfolio companies in the industry, if any;
Attendance at and participation in board meetings of the portfolio company; and
Review of monthly and quarterly financial statements and financial projections for the portfolio company.
Investment Valuation
To value our investments, we follow the guidance of ASC 820, Fair Value Measurement ("ASC 820"), that defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value in conformity with United States generally accepted accounting principles and requires disclosures about fair value measurements. In accordance with ASC 820, the fair value of our investments is defined as the price that we would receive upon selling an investment in an orderly transaction to an independent buyer in the principal or most advantageous market in which that investment is transacted.
ASC 820 classifies the inputs used to measure these fair values into the following hierarchy:
Level 1: Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities, accessible by us at the measurement date.
Level 2: Quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets, or quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active, or other observable inputs other than quoted prices.
Level 3: Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.
In all cases, the level in the fair value hierarchy within which the fair value measurement in its entirety falls has been determined based on the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. Our assessment of the significance of a particular input to the fair value measurement in its entirety requires judgment and considers factors specific to each investment.
Our Board of Directors has established procedures for the valuation of our investment portfolio. These procedures are detailed below.
Investments for which market quotations are readily available are valued at such market quotations.
For most of our investments, market quotations are not available. With respect to investments for which market quotations are not readily available or when such market quotations are deemed not to represent fair value, our Board of Directors has approved a multi-step valuation process each quarter, as described below:
1.
Each portfolio company or investment is reviewed by our investment professionals with independent valuation firms engaged by our Board of Directors;
2.
The independent valuation firms conduct independent valuations and make their own independent assessments;
3.
The Audit Committee of our Board of Directors reviews and discusses the preliminary valuation of the Investment Adviser and that of the independent valuation firms; and
4.
The Board of Directors discusses valuations and determines the fair value of each investment in our portfolio in good faith based on the input of the Investment Adviser, the respective independent valuation firm and the Audit Committee.

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Investments are valued utilizing a yield analysis, enterprise value (“EV”) analysis, net asset value analysis, liquidation analysis, discounted cash flow analysis, or a combination of methods, as appropriate. The yield analysis uses loan spreads and other relevant information implied by market data involving identical or comparable assets or liabilities. Under the EV analysis, the EV of a portfolio company is first determined and allocated over the portfolio company’s securities in order of their preference relative to one another (i.e., “waterfall” allocation). To determine the EV, we typically use a market multiples approach that considers relevant and applicable market trading data of guideline public companies, transaction metrics from precedent M&A transactions and/or a discounted cash flow analysis. The net asset value analysis is used to derive a value of an underlying investment (such as real estate property) by dividing a relevant earnings stream by an appropriate capitalization rate. For this purpose, we consider capitalization rates for similar properties as may be obtained from guideline public companies and/or relevant transactions. The liquidation analysis is intended to approximate the net recovery value of an investment based on, among other things, assumptions regarding liquidation proceeds based on a hypothetical liquidation of a portfolio company’s assets. The discounted cash flow analysis uses valuation techniques to convert future cash flows or earnings to a range of fair values from which a single estimate may be derived utilizing an appropriate discount rate. The measurement is based on the net present value indicated by current market expectations about those future amounts.
In applying these methodologies, additional factors that we consider in fair value pricing our investments may include, as we deem relevant: security covenants, call protection provisions, and information rights; the nature and realizable value of any collateral; the portfolio company’s ability to make payments; the principal markets in which the portfolio company does business; publicly available financial ratios of peer companies; the principal market; and enterprise values, among other factors.
Our investments in CLOs are classified as ASC 820 Level 3 securities and are valued using a discounted cash flow model. The valuations have been accomplished through the analysis of the CLO deal structures to identify the risk exposures from the modeling point of view. For each CLO security, the most appropriate valuation approach has been chosen from alternative approaches to ensure the most accurate valuation for such security. To value a CLO, both the assets and the liabilities of the CLO capital structure are modeled. We use a waterfall engine to store the collateral data, generate collateral cash flows from the assets based on various assumptions for the risk factors, distribute the cash flows to the liability structure based on the payment priorities, and discount them back using current market discount rates. The main risk factors are: default risk, interest rate risk, downgrade risk, and credit spread risk.
For a discussion of the risks inherent in determining the value of securities for which readily available market values do not exist, see "Risk Factors – Risks Relating to Our Business – Most of our portfolio investments are recorded at fair value as determined in good faith under the direction of our Board of Directors and, as a result, there is uncertainty as to the value of our portfolio investments."
Valuation of Other Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities
The Fair Value Option within ASC 825, Financial Instruments, specifically ASC 825-10-25, permits an entity to elect fair value as the initial and subsequent measurement attribute for eligible assets and liabilities for which the assets and liabilities are measured using another measurement attribute. For our non-investment assets and liabilities, we have elected not to value them at fair value as would be permitted by ASC 825-10-25.
Managerial Assistance
As a BDC, we are obligated under the 1940 Act to make available to certain of our portfolio companies significant managerial assistance. "Making available significant managerial assistance" refers to any arrangement whereby we provide significant guidance and counsel concerning the management, operations, or business objectives and policies of a portfolio company. We are also deemed to be providing managerial assistance to all portfolio companies that we control, either by ourselves or in conjunction with others. The nature and extent of significant managerial assistance provided by us will vary according to the particular needs of each portfolio company. Examples of such activities include advice on marketing, operations, fulfillment and overall strategy, capital budgeting, managing relationships with financing sources, recruiting management personnel, evaluating acquisition and divestiture opportunities, participating in board and management meetings, consulting with and advising officers of portfolio companies, and providing other organizational and financial guidance.
Prospect Administration, through a managerial assistance agreement executed with each portfolio company to which we provide managerial assistance, provides such managerial assistance on our behalf. In doing so, Prospect Administration utilizes personnel of our Investment Adviser, Prospect Capital Management. We, on behalf of Prospect Administration, invoice portfolio companies receiving and paying for managerial assistance, and we remit to Prospect Administration its allocated cost of providing such services, including the allocated cost of Prospect Capital Management personnel it utilizes for that purpose. Our payments to Prospect Administration are periodically reviewed by our Board of Directors.

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Investment Adviser
Prospect Capital Management manages our investments as the Investment Adviser. Prospect Capital Management is a Delaware limited liability corporation that has been registered as an investment adviser under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (the "Advisers Act") since March 31, 2004. Prospect Capital Management is led by John F. Barry III and M. Grier Eliasek, two senior executives with significant investment advisory and business experience. Both Messrs. Barry and Eliasek spend a significant amount of their time in their roles at Prospect Capital Management working on our behalf. The principal executive offices of Prospect Capital Management are 10 East 40th Street, 42nd Floor, New York, NY 10016. We depend on the due diligence, skill and network of business contacts of the senior management of the Investment Adviser. We also depend, to a significant extent, on the Investment Adviser's investment professionals and the information and deal flow generated by those investment professionals in the course of their investment and portfolio management activities. The Investment Adviser's senior management team evaluates, negotiates, structures, closes, monitors and services our investments. Our future success depends to a significant extent on the continued service of the senior management team, particularly John F. Barry III and M. Grier Eliasek. The departure of any of the senior managers of the Investment Adviser could have a materially adverse effect on our ability to achieve our investment objective. In addition, we can offer no assurance that Prospect Capital Management will remain the Investment Adviser or that we will continue to have access to its investment professionals or its information and deal flow. Under the Investment Advisory Agreement (as defined below), we pay Prospect Capital Management investment advisory fees, which consist of an annual base management fee based on our gross assets as well as a two-part incentive fee based on our performance. Mr. Barry currently controls Prospect Capital Management.
Investment Advisory Agreement
Terms
We have entered into an investment advisory and management agreement (the "Investment Advisory Agreement") with Prospect Capital Management, under which the Investment Adviser, subject to the overall supervision of our Board of Directors, manages our day-to-day operations and provides us with investment advisory services. Under the terms of the Investment Advisory Agreement, the Investment Adviser: (i) determines the composition of our portfolio, the nature and timing of the changes to our portfolio and the manner of implementing such changes, (ii) identifies, evaluates and negotiates the structure of the investments we make (including performing due diligence on our prospective portfolio companies); and (iii) closes and monitors investments we make.
Prospect Capital Management's services under the Investment Advisory Agreement are not exclusive, and it is free to furnish similar services to other entities so long as its services to us are not impaired. For providing these services, the Investment Adviser receives a fee from us, consisting of two components: a base management fee and an incentive fee. The base management fee is calculated at an annual rate of 2.00% on our gross assets (including amounts borrowed). For services currently rendered under the Investment Advisory Agreement, the base management fee is payable quarterly in arrears. The base management fee is calculated based on the average value of our gross assets at the end of the two most recently completed calendar quarters and appropriately adjusted for any share issuances or repurchases during the current calendar quarter. Base management fees for any partial month or quarter are appropriately prorated.
The incentive fee has two parts. The first part, the income incentive fee, is calculated and payable quarterly in arrears based on our pre-incentive fee net investment income for the immediately preceding calendar quarter. For this purpose, pre-incentive fee net investment income means interest income, dividend income and any other income (including any other fees (other than fees for providing managerial assistance), such as commitment, origination, structuring, diligence and consulting fees and other fees that we receive from portfolio companies) accrued during the calendar quarter, minus our operating expenses for the quarter (including the base management fee, expenses payable under the Administration Agreement described below, and any interest expense and dividends paid on any issued and outstanding preferred stock, but excluding the incentive fee). Pre-incentive fee net investment income includes, in the case of investments with a deferred interest feature (such as original issue discount, debt instruments with payment in kind interest and zero coupon securities), accrued income that we have not yet received in cash. Pre-incentive fee net investment income does not include any realized capital gains, realized capital losses or unrealized capital appreciation or depreciation. Pre-incentive fee net investment income, expressed as a rate of return on the value of our net assets at the end of the immediately preceding calendar quarter, is compared to a "hurdle rate" of 1.75% per quarter (7.00% annualized).

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The net investment income used to calculate this part of the incentive fee is also included in the amount of the gross assets used to calculate the 2.00% base management fee. We pay the Investment Adviser an income incentive fee with respect to our pre-incentive fee net investment income in each calendar quarter as follows:
No incentive fee in any calendar quarter in which our pre-incentive fee net investment income does not exceed the hurdle rate;
100.00% of our pre-incentive fee net investment income with respect to that portion of such pre-incentive fee net investment income, if any, that exceeds the hurdle rate but is less than 125.00% of the quarterly hurdle rate in any calendar quarter (8.75% annualized with a 7.00% annualized hurdle rate); and
20.00% of the amount of our pre-incentive fee net investment income, if any, that exceeds 125.00% of the quarterly hurdle rate in any calendar quarter (8.75% annualized with a 7.00% annualized hurdle rate).
These calculations are appropriately prorated for any period of less than three months and adjusted for any share issuances or repurchases during the current quarter.
The second part of the incentive fee, the capital gains incentive fee, is determined and payable in arrears as of the end of each calendar year (or upon termination of the Investment Advisory Agreement, as of the termination date), and equals 20.00% of our realized capital gains for the calendar year, if any, computed net of all realized capital losses and unrealized capital depreciation at the end of such year. In determining the capital gains incentive fee payable to the Investment Adviser, we calculate the aggregate realized capital gains, aggregate realized capital losses and aggregate unrealized capital depreciation, as applicable, with respect to each investment that has been in our portfolio. For the purpose of this calculation, an "investment" is defined as the total of all rights and claims which may be asserted against a portfolio company arising out of our participation in the debt, equity, and other financial instruments issued by that company. Aggregate realized capital gains, if any, equals the sum of the differences between the aggregate net sales price of each investment and the aggregate cost basis of such investment when sold or otherwise disposed of. Aggregate realized capital losses equal the sum of the amounts by which the aggregate net sales price of each investment is less than the aggregate cost basis of such investment when sold or otherwise disposed. Aggregate unrealized capital depreciation equals the sum of the differences, if negative, between the aggregate valuation of each investment and the aggregate cost basis of such investment as of the applicable calendar year end. At the end of the applicable calendar year, the amount of capital gains that serves as the basis for our calculation of the capital gains incentive fee involves netting aggregate realized capital gains against aggregate realized capital losses on a since-inception basis and then reducing this amount by the aggregate unrealized capital depreciation. If this number is positive, then the capital gains incentive fee payable is equal to 20.00% of such amount, less the aggregate amount of any capital gains incentive fees paid since inception.
Examples of Quarterly Incentive Fee Calculation
Example 1: Income Incentive Fee*
*The hypothetical amount of pre-incentive fee net investment income shown is based on a percentage of total net assets.
Alternative 1
Assumptions
Investment income (including interest, dividends, fees, etc.) = 1.25%
Hurdle rate(1) = 1.75%
Base management fee(2) = 0.50%
Other expenses (legal, accounting, custodian, transfer agent, etc.)(3) = 0.20%
Pre-incentive fee net investment income (investment income – (base management fee + other expenses)) = 0.55%
Pre-incentive net investment income does not exceed hurdle rate, therefore there is no income incentive fee.

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Alternative 2
Assumptions
Investment income (including interest, dividends, fees, etc.) = 2.70%
Hurdle rate(1) = 1.75%
Base management fee(2) = 0.50%
Other expenses (legal, accounting, custodian, transfer agent, etc.)(3) = 0.20%
Pre-incentive fee net investment income (investment income – (base management fee + other expenses)) = 2.00%
Pre-incentive net investment income exceeds hurdle rate, therefore there is an income incentive fee payable by us to the Investment Adviser. The Income Incentive Fee would be calculated as follows:
= 100% × "Catch Up" + the greater of 0% AND (20% × (pre-incentive fee net investment income – 2.1875%)
= (100% × (2.00% - 1.75%)) + 0%
= 100% × 0.25% + 0%
= 0.25%
Alternative 3
Assumptions
Investment income (including interest, dividends, fees, etc.) = 3.00%
Hurdle rate(1) = 1.75%
Base management fee(2) = 0.50%
Other expenses (legal, accounting, custodian, transfer agent, etc.)(3) = 0.20%
Pre-incentive fee net investment income (investment income – (base management fee + other expenses)) = 2.30%
Pre-incentive net investment income exceeds hurdle rate, therefore there is an income incentive fee payable by us to the Investment Adviser. The Income Incentive Fee would be calculated as follows:
= 100% × "Catch Up" + the greater of 0% AND (20% × (pre-incentive fee net investment income – 2.1875%)
= (100% × (2.1875% – 1.75%)) + the greater of 0% AND (20% × (2.30% – 2.1875%))
= (100% × 0.4375%) + (20% × 0.1125%)
= 0.4375% + 0.0225%
= 0.46%
 
(1)
Represents 7% annualized hurdle rate.
(2)
Represents 2% annualized base management fee.
(3)
Excludes organizational and offering expenses.

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Example 2: Capital Gains Incentive Fee
Alternative 1
Assumptions
Year 1: $20 million investment made
Year 2: Fair market value ("FMV") of investment determined to be $22 million
Year 3: FMV of investment determined to be $17 million
Year 4: Investment sold for $21 million
The impact, if any, on the capital gains portion of the incentive fee would be:
Year 1: No impact
Year 2: No impact
Year 3: Decrease base amount on which the second part of the incentive fee is calculated by $3 million (unrealized capital depreciation)
Year 4: Increase base amount on which the second part of the incentive fee is calculated by $4 million ($1 million of realized capital gain and $3 million reversal in unrealized capital depreciation)
Alternative 2
Assumptions
Year 1: $20 million investment made
Year 2: FMV of investment determined to be $17 million
Year 3: FMV of investment determined to be $17 million
Year 4: FMV of investment determined to be $21 million
Year 5: FMV of investment determined to be $18 million
Year 6: Investment sold for $15 million
The impact, if any, on the capital gains portion of the incentive fee would be:
Year 1: No impact
Year 2: Decrease base amount on which the second part of the incentive fee is calculated by $3 million (unrealized capital depreciation)
Year 3: No impact
Year 4: Increase base amount on which the second part of the incentive fee is calculated by $3 million (reversal in unrealized capital depreciation)
Year 5: Decrease base amount on which the second part of the incentive fee is calculated by $2 million (unrealized capital depreciation)
Year 6: Decrease base amount on which the second part of the incentive fee is calculated by $3 million ($5 million of realized capital loss offset by a $2 million reversal in unrealized capital depreciation)

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Alternative 3
Assumptions
Year 1: $20 million investment made in company A ("Investment A") and $20 million investment made in company B ("Investment B")
Year 2: FMV of Investment A is determined to be $21 million and Investment B is sold for $18 million
Year 3: Investment A is sold for $23 million
The impact, if any, on the capital gains portion of the incentive fee would be:
Year 1: No impact
Year 2: Decrease base amount on which the second part of the incentive fee is calculated by $2 million (realized capital loss on Investment B)
Year 3: Increase base amount on which the second part of the incentive fee is calculated by $3 million (realized capital gain on Investment A)
Alternative 4
Assumptions
Year 1: $20 million investment made in company A ("Investment A") and $20 million investment made in company B ("Investment B")
Year 2: FMV of Investment A is determined to be $21 million and FMV of Investment B is determined to be $17 million
Year 3: FMV of Investment A is determined to be $18 million and FMV of Investment B is determined to be $18 million
Year 4: FMV of Investment A is determined to be $19 million and FMV of Investment B is determined to be $21 million
Year 5: Investment A is sold for $17 million and Investment B is sold for $23 million
The impact, if any, on the capital gains portion of the incentive fee would be:
Year 1: No impact
Year 2: Decrease base amount on which the second part of the incentive fee is calculated by $3 million (unrealized capital depreciation on Investment B)
Year 3: Decrease base amount on which the second part of the incentive fee is calculated by $1 million ($2 million in unrealized capital depreciation on Investment A and $1 million recovery in unrealized capital depreciation on Investment B)
Year 4: Increase base amount on which the second part of the incentive fee is calculated by $3 million ($1 million recovery in unrealized capital depreciation on Investment A and $2 million recovery in unrealized capital depreciation on Investment B)
Year 5: Increase base amount on which the second part of the incentive fee is calculated by $1 million ($3 million realized capital gain on Investment B offset by $3 million realized capital loss on Investment A plus a $1 million reversal in unrealized capital depreciation on Investment A from Year 4)

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Duration and Termination
The Investment Advisory Agreement was originally approved by our Board of Directors on June 23, 2004 and was recently re-approved by the Board of Directors on May 5, 2014 for an additional one-year term expiring June 22, 2015. Unless terminated earlier as described below, it will remain in effect from year to year thereafter if approved annually by our Board of Directors or by the affirmative vote of the holders of a majority of our outstanding voting securities, including, in either case, approval by a majority of our directors who are not interested persons. The Investment Advisory Agreement will automatically terminate in the event of its assignment. The Investment Advisory Agreement may be terminated by either party without penalty upon not more than 60 days' written notice to the other. See "Risk Factors – Risks Relating to Our Business – We are dependent upon Prospect Capital Management's key management personnel for our future success."
Indemnification
The Investment Advisory Agreement provides that, absent willful misfeasance, bad faith or gross negligence in the performance of its duties or by reason of the reckless disregard of its duties and obligations, Prospect Capital Management and its officers, managers, agents, employees, controlling persons, members and any other person or entity affiliated with it are entitled to indemnification from us for any damages, liabilities, costs and expenses (including reasonable attorneys' fees and amounts reasonably paid in settlement) arising from the rendering of Prospect Capital Management's services under the Investment Advisory Agreement or otherwise as the Investment Adviser.
Administration Agreement
We have also entered into an administration agreement (the "Administration Agreement") with Prospect Administration under which Prospect Administration, among other things, provides (or arranges for the provision of) administrative services and facilities for us. For providing these services, we reimburse Prospect Administration for our allocable portion of overhead incurred by Prospect Administration in performing its obligations under the Administration Agreement, including rent and our allocable portion of the costs of Brian H. Oswald, our Chief Financial Officer and Chief Compliance Officer, and his staff, including the internal legal staff. Under this agreement, Prospect Administration furnishes us with office facilities, equipment and clerical, bookkeeping and record keeping services at such facilities. Prospect Administration also performs, or oversees the performance of, our required administrative services, which include, among other things, being responsible for the financial records that we are required to maintain and preparing reports to our stockholders and reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC"). In addition, Prospect Administration assists us in determining and publishing our net asset value, overseeing the preparation and filing of our tax returns and the printing and dissemination of reports to our stockholders, and generally oversees the payment of our expenses and the performance of administrative and professional services rendered to us by others. Under the Administration Agreement, Prospect Administration also provides on our behalf managerial assistance to those portfolio companies to which we are required to provide such assistance (see "Ongoing Relationships with Portfolio Companies – Managerial Assistance"). The Administration Agreement may be terminated by either party without penalty upon 60 days' written notice to the other party. Prospect Administration is a subsidiary of the Investment Adviser.
During the years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012, Prospect Administration received payments of $7.6 million, $1.4 million and $1.1 million directly from our controlled portfolio companies for legal, tax and portfolio level accounting services. We were given a credit for these payments as a reduction of the administrative services cost payable by us to Prospect Administration. Had Prospect Administration not received these payments, Prospect Administration's charges for its administrative services would have increased by these amounts.
We reimbursed Prospect Administration $14.4 million, $8.7 million and $6.8 million for the years ended June 30, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively, for services it provided to us at cost.
Payment of Our Expenses
All investment professionals of the Investment Adviser and its respective staff, when and to the extent engaged in providing investment advisory and management services, and the compensation and routine overhead expenses of such personnel allocable to such services, will be provided and paid for by the Investment Adviser. We bear all other costs and expenses of our operations and transactions, including those relating to: organization and offering; calculation of our net asset value (including the cost and expenses of any independent valuation firm); expenses incurred by Prospect Capital Management payable to third parties, including agents, consultants or other advisers (such as independent valuation firms, accountants and legal counsel), in monitoring our financial and legal affairs and in monitoring our investments and performing due diligence on our prospective portfolio companies; interest payable on debt, if any, and dividends payable on preferred stock, if any, incurred to finance our investments; offerings of our debt, our preferred shares, our common stock and other securities; investment advisory fees; fees payable to third parties, including agents, consultants or other advisors, relating to, or associated with, evaluating and making investments; transfer agent

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and custodial fees; registration fees; listing fees; taxes; independent directors' fees and expenses; costs of preparing and filing reports or other documents with the SEC; the costs of any reports, proxy statements or other notices to stockholders, including printing costs; our allocable portion of the fidelity bond, directors and officers/errors and omissions liability insurance, and any other insurance premiums; direct costs and expenses of administration, including auditor and legal costs; and all other expenses incurred by us, by the Investment Adviser or by Prospect Administration in connection with administering our business, such as our allocable portion of overhead under the Administration Agreement, including rent and our allocable portion of the costs of our Chief Financial Officer and Chief Compliance Officer and their respective staffs under the sub-administration agreement, as further described below.
License Agreement
We entered into a license agreement with Prospect Capital Management pursuant to which Prospect Capital Management agreed to grant us a non-exclusive, royalty free license to use the name "Prospect Capital." Under this agreement, we have a right to use the Prospect Capital name, for so long as Prospect Capital Management or one of its affiliates remains the Investment Adviser. Other than with respect to this limited license, we have no legal right to the Prospect Capital name. This license agreement will remain in effect for so long as the Investment Advisory Agreement with the Investment Adviser is in effect.
Determination of Net Asset Value
The net asset value per share of our outstanding shares of common stock will be determined quarterly by dividing the value of total assets minus liabilities by the total number of shares outstanding.
In calculating the value of our total assets, we will value investments for which market quotations are readily available at such market quotations. Short-term investments which mature in 60 days or less, such as U.S. Treasury bills, are valued at amortized cost, which approximates market value. The amortized cost method involves recording a security at its cost (i.e., principal amount plus any premium and less any discount) on the date of purchase and thereafter amortizing/accreting that difference between the principal amount due at maturity and cost assuming a constant yield to maturity as determined at the time of purchase. Short-term securities which mature in more than 60 days are valued at current market quotations by an independent pricing service or at the mean between the bid and ask prices obtained from at least two brokers or dealers (if available, or otherwise by a principal market maker or a primary market dealer). Investments in money market mutual funds are valued at their net asset value as of the close of business on the day of valuation.
Most of the investments in our portfolio do not have market quotations which are readily available, meaning the investments do not have actively traded markets. Debt and equity securities for which market quotations are not readily available are valued with the assistance of an independent valuation service using a documented valuation policy and a valuation process that is consistently applied under the direction of our Board of Directors. For a discussion of the risks inherent in determining the value of securities for which readily available market values do not exist, see "Risk Factors – Risks Relating to Our Business – Most of our portfolio investments are recorded at fair value as determined in good faith under the direction of our Board of Directors and, as a result, there is uncertainty as to the value of our portfolio investments."
The factors that may be taken into account in valuing such investments include, as relevant, the portfolio company's ability to make payments, its estimated earnings and projected discounted cash flows, the nature and realizable value of any collateral, the financial environment in which the portfolio company operates, comparisons to securities of similar publicly traded companies, changes in interest rates for similar debt instruments and other relevant factors. Due to the inherent uncertainty of determining the fair value of investments that do not have readily available market quotations, the fair value of these investments may differ significantly from the values that would have been used had such market quotations existed for such investments, and any such differences could be material.
As part of the fair valuation process, the independent valuation firms engaged by the Board of Directors perform a review of each debt and equity investment requiring fair valuation and provide a range of values for each investment, which, along with management's valuation recommendations, is reviewed by our Audit Committee. Management and the independent valuation firms may adjust their preliminary evaluations to reflect comments provided by our Audit Committee. The Audit Committee reviews the final valuation reports and management's valuation recommendations and makes a recommendation to the Board of Directors based on its analysis of the methodologies employed and the various weights that should be accorded to each portion of the valuation as well as factors that the independent valuation firms and management may not have included in their evaluation processes. The Board of Directors then evaluates the Audit Committee recommendations and undertakes a similar analysis to determine the fair value of each investment in the portfolio in good faith.

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Determination of fair values involves subjective judgments and estimates not susceptible to substantiation by auditing procedures. Accordingly, under current accounting standards, the notes to our financial statements will refer to the uncertainty with respect to the possible effect of such valuations, and any change in such valuations, on our financial statements.
Dividend Reinvestment Plan
We have adopted a dividend reinvestment plan that provides for reinvestment of our distributions on behalf of our stockholders, unless a stockholder elects to receive cash as provided below. As a result, when our Board of Directors authorizes, and we declare, a cash dividend, then our stockholders who have not "opted out" of our dividend reinvestment plan will have their cash dividends automatically reinvested in additional shares of our common stock, rather than receiving the cash dividends.
No action is required on the part of a registered stockholder to have their cash dividend reinvested in shares of our common stock. A registered stockholder may elect to receive an entire dividend in cash by notifying the plan administrator and our transfer agent and registrar, in writing so that such notice is received by the plan administrator no later than the record date for dividends to stockholders. The plan administrator sets up an account for shares acquired through the plan for each stockholder who has not elected to receive dividends in cash and hold such shares in non-certificated form. Upon request by a stockholder participating in the plan, the plan administrator will, instead of crediting shares to the participant's account, issue a certificate registered in the participant's name for the number of whole shares of our common stock and a check for any fractional share. Such request by a stockholder must be received three days prior to the dividend payable date in order for that dividend to be paid in cash. If such request is received less than three days prior to the dividend payable date, then the dividends are reinvested and shares are repurchased for the stockholder's account; however, future dividends are paid out in cash on all balances. Those stockholders whose shares are held by a broker or other financial intermediary may receive dividends in cash by notifying their broker or other financial intermediary of their election.
We primarily use newly-issued shares to implement the plan, whether our shares are trading at a premium or at a discount to net asset value. However, we reserve the right to purchase shares in the open market in connection with the implementation of the plan. The number of shares to be issued to a stockholder is determined by dividing the total dollar amount of the dividend payable to such stockholder by the market price per share of our common stock at the close of regular trading on the NASDAQ Global Select Market on the last business day before the payment date for such dividend. Market price per share on that date will be the closing price for such shares on the NASDAQ Global Select Market or, if no sale is reported for such day, at the average of their reported bid and asked prices. The number of shares of our common stock to be outstanding after giving effect to payment of the dividend cannot be established until the value per share at which additional shares will be issued has been determined and elections of our stockholders have been tabulated. Stockholders who do not elect to receive dividends in shares of common stock may experience accretion to the net asset value of their shares if our shares are trading at a premium at the time we issue new shares under the plan and dilution if our shares are trading at a discount. The level of accretion or discount would depend on various factors, including the proportion of our stockholders who participate in the plan, the level of premium or discount at which our shares are trading and the amount of the dividend payable to a stockholder.
There are no brokerage charges or other charges to stockholders who participate in the plan. The plan administrator's fees under the plan are paid by us. If a participant elects by written notice to the plan administrator to have the plan administrator sell part or all of the shares held by the plan administrator in the participant's account and remit the proceeds to the participant, the plan administrator is authorized to deduct a $15 transaction fee plus a $0.10 per share brokerage commissions from the proceeds.
Stockholders who receive dividends in the form of stock are subject to the same U.S. federal, state and local tax consequences as are stockholders who elect to receive their dividends in cash. A stockholder's basis for determining gain or loss upon the sale of stock received in a dividend from us will be equal to the total dollar amount of the dividend payable to the stockholder. Any stock received in a dividend will have a new holding period for tax purposes commencing on the day following the day on which the shares are credited to the U.S. Stockholder's account (as defined below).
Participants may terminate their accounts under the plan by notifying the plan administrator via its website at www.amstock.com or by filling out the transaction request form located at the bottom of their statement and sending it to the plan administrator at American Stock Transfer & Trust Company, P.O. Box 922, Wall Street Station, New York, NY 10269-0560 or by calling the plan administrator's Interactive Voice Response System at (888) 888-0313.
The plan may be terminated by us upon notice in writing mailed to each participant at least 30 days prior to any payable date for the payment of any dividend by us. All correspondence concerning the plan should be directed to the plan administrator by mail at American Stock Transfer & Trust Company, 59 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10007 or by telephone at (718) 921-8200.

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Stockholders who purchased their shares through or hold their shares in the name of a broker or financial institution should consult with a representative of their broker or financial institution with respect to their participation in our dividend reinvestment plan. Such holders of our stock may not be identified as our registered stockholders with the plan administrator and may not automatically have their cash dividend reinvested in shares of our common stock by the administrator.
Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations
The following discussion is a general summary of the material U.S. federal income tax considerations applicable to us and to an investment in our shares. This summary does not purport to be a complete description of the income tax considerations applicable to us or our investors on such an investment. For example, we have not described tax consequences that we assume to be generally known by investors or certain considerations that may be relevant to certain types of holders subject to special treatment under U.S. federal income tax laws, including stockholders subject to the alternative minimum tax, tax-exempt organizations, insurance companies, dealers in securities, pension plans and trusts, financial institutions, U.S. Stockholders (as defined below) whose functional currency is not the U.S. dollar, persons who mark-to-market our shares and persons who hold our shares as part of a "straddle," "hedge" or "conversion" transaction. This summary assumes that investors hold our common stock as capital assets (within the meaning of the Code). The discussion is based upon the Code, Treasury regulations, and administrative and judicial interpretations, each as of the date of this report and all of which are subject to change, possibly retroactively, which could affect the continuing validity of this discussion. This summary does not discuss any aspects of U.S. estate or gift tax or foreign, state or local tax. It does not discuss the special treatment under U.S. federal income tax laws that could result if we invested in tax-exempt securities or certain other investment assets.
A "U.S. Stockholder" is a beneficial owner of shares of our common stock that is for U.S. federal income tax purposes:
A citizen or individual resident of the United States;
A corporation, or other entity treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, created or organized in or under the laws of the United States or any state thereof or the District of Columbia;
An estate, the income of which is subject to U.S. federal income taxation regardless of its source; or
A trust if (1) a U.S. court is able to exercise primary supervision over the administration of such trust and one or more U.S. persons have the authority to control all substantial decisions of the trust or (2) it has a valid election in place to be treated as a U.S. person.
A "Non-U.S. Stockholder" is a beneficial owner of shares of our common stock that is not a partnership and is not a U.S. Stockholder.
If a partnership (including an entity treated as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes) holds shares of our common stock, the tax treatment of a partner in the partnership will generally depend upon the status of the partner and the activities of the partnership. A prospective stockholder that is a partner of a partnership holding shares of our common stock should consult its tax advisor with respect to the purchase, ownership and disposition of shares of our common stock.
Tax matters are very complicated and the tax consequences to an investor of an investment in our shares will depend on the facts of his, her or its particular situation. We encourage investors to consult their own tax advisors regarding the specific consequences of such an investment, including tax reporting requirements, the applicability of U.S. federal, state, local and foreign tax laws, eligibility for the benefits of any applicable tax treaty and the effect of any possible changes in the tax laws.
Election to be Taxed as a RIC
As a business development company, we have elected and intend to continue to qualify to be treated as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code. As a RIC, we generally are not subject to corporate-level U.S. federal income taxes on any ordinary income or capital gains that we distribute to our stockholders as dividends. To qualify as a RIC, we must, among other things, meet certain source-of-income and asset diversification requirements (as described below). In addition, to obtain RIC tax treatment, we must distribute to our stockholders, for each taxable year, at least 90% of our "investment company taxable income," which is generally our ordinary income plus the excess of realized net short-term capital gains over realized net long-term capital losses (the "Annual Distribution Requirement").

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Taxation as a RIC
In order to qualify as a RIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we must, among other things:
Qualify to be treated as a business development company or be registered as a management investment company under the 1940 Act at all times during each taxable year;
Derive in each taxable year at least 90% of our gross income from dividends, interest, payments with respect to certain securities loans, gains from the sale or other disposition of stock or other securities or currencies or other income derived with respect to our business of investing in such stock, securities or currencies and net income derived from an interest in a "qualified publicly traded partnership" (as defined in the Code) (the "90% Income Test"); and
Diversify our holdings so that at the end of each quarter of the taxable year:
At least 50% of the value of our assets consists of cash, cash equivalents, U.S. government securities, securities of other RICs, and other securities if such other securities of any one issuer do not represent more than 5% of the value of our assets or more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of the issuer (which for these purposes includes the equity securities of a "qualified publicly traded partnership"); and
No more than 25% of the value of our assets is invested in the securities, other than U.S. government securities or securities of other RICs, (i) of one issuer (ii) of two or more issuers that are controlled, as determined under applicable tax rules, by us and that are engaged in the same or similar or related trades or businesses or (iii) of one or more "qualified publicly traded partnerships," (the "Diversification Tests").
To the extent that we invest in entities treated as partnerships for U.S. federal income tax purposes (other than a "qualified publicly traded partnership"), we generally must include the items of gross income derived by the partnerships for purposes of the 90% Income Test, and the income that is derived from a partnership (other than a "qualified publicly traded partnership") will be treated as qualifying income for purposes of the 90% Income Test only to the extent that such income is attributable to items of income of the partnership which would be qualifying income if realized by us directly. In addition, we generally must take into account our proportionate share of the assets held by partnerships (other than a "qualified publicly traded partnership") in which we are a partner for purposes of the Diversification Tests. If the partnership is a "qualified publicly traded partnership," the net income derived from such partnership will be qualifying income for purposes of the 90% Income Test, and interests in the partnership will be "securities" for purposes of the Diversification Tests. We monitor our investments in equity securities of entities that are treated as partnerships for U.S. federal income tax purposes to prevent our disqualification as a RIC.
In order to meet the 90% Income Test, we may establish one or more special purpose corporations to hold assets from which we do not anticipate earning dividend, interest or other qualifying income under the 90% Income Test. Any such special purpose corporation would generally be subject to U.S. federal income tax, and could result in a reduced after-tax yield on the portion of our assets held by such corporation.
Provided that we qualify as a RIC and satisfy the Annual Distribution Requirement, we will not be subject to U.S. federal income tax on the portion of our investment company taxable income and net capital gain (which we define as net long-term capital gains in excess of net short-term capital losses) we timely distribute to stockholders. We will be subject to U.S. federal income tax at the regular corporate rates on any income or capital gain not distributed (or deemed distributed) to our stockholders.
We will be subject to a 4% non-deductible U.S. federal excise tax on certain undistributed income of RICs unless we distribute in a timely manner an amount at least equal to the sum of (i) 98% of our ordinary income recognized during the calendar year, (ii) 98.2% of our capital gain net income, as defined by the Code, recognized for the one year period ending October 31 in that calendar year and (iii) any income recognized, but not distributed, in preceding years.
We may be required to recognize taxable income in circumstances in which we do not receive cash. For example, if we hold debt obligations that are treated under applicable tax rules as having original issue discount, we must include in income each year a portion of the original issue discount that accrues over the life of the obligation, regardless of whether cash representing such income is received by us in the same taxable year. Because any original issue discount accrued will be included in our investment company taxable income for the year of accrual, we may be required to make a distribution to our stockholders in order to satisfy the Annual Distribution Requirement, even though we will not have received any corresponding cash amount.
Gain or loss realized by us from warrants acquired by us as well as any loss attributable to the lapse of such warrants generally will be treated as capital gain or loss. Such gain or loss generally will be long-term or short-term, depending on how long we held a particular warrant. As a RIC, we are not allowed to carry forward or carry back a net operating loss for purposes of computing our investment company taxable income in other taxable years.

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Although we do not presently expect to do so, we are authorized to borrow funds and to sell assets in order to satisfy distribution requirements. However, under the 1940 Act, we are not permitted to make distributions to our stockholders while our debt obligations and other senior securities are outstanding unless certain "asset coverage" tests are met. See "Regulation as a Business Development Company – Senior Securities." Moreover, our ability to dispose of assets to meet our distribution requirements may be limited by (1) the illiquid nature of our portfolio and/or (2) other requirements relating to our status as a RIC, including the Diversification Tests. If we dispose of assets in order to meet the Annual Distribution Requirement or to avoid the excise tax, we may make such dispositions at times that, from an investment standpoint, are not advantageous.
On June 26, 2014, we received a private letter ruling from the Internal Revenue Service (the "IRS") permitting us to pay up to 80% of our required dividends in stock for the tax years ending August 31, 2014 and August 31, 2015. Any dividends paid in stock will be taxable to the shareholder as if the dividend had been paid in cash and we will receive a dividend paid deduction for such distribution.
If we fail to satisfy the Annual Distribution Requirement or otherwise fail to qualify as a RIC in any taxable year, we would be subject to tax on all of our taxable income at regular corporate rates. We would not be able to deduct distributions to stockholders, nor would we be required to make distributions. Distributions would generally be taxable to our individual and other non-corporate taxable stockholders as ordinary dividend income eligible for the reduced maximum rate applicable to qualified dividend income to the extent of our current and accumulated earnings and profits, provided certain holding period and other requirements are met. Subject to certain limitations under the Code, corporate distributees would be eligible for the dividends-received deduction. To qualify again to be taxed as a RIC in a subsequent year, we would be required to distribute to our shareholders our accumulated earnings and profits attributable to non-RIC years reduced by an interest charge on 50% of such earnings and profits payable by us as an additional tax. In addition, if we failed to qualify as a RIC for a period greater than two taxable years, then, in order to qualify as a RIC in a subsequent year, we would be required to elect to recognize and pay tax on any net built-in gain (the excess of aggregate gain, including items of income, over aggregate loss that would have been realized if we had been liquidated) or, alternatively, be subject to taxation on such built-in gain recognized for a period of ten years.
Certain of our investment practices may be subject to special and complex U.S. federal income tax provisions that may, among other things, (i) disallow, suspend or otherwise limit the allowance of certain losses or deductions, (ii) convert lower taxed long-term capital gain and qualified dividend income into higher taxed short-term capital gain or ordinary income, (iii) convert an ordinary loss or a deduction into a capital loss (the deductibility of which is more limited), (iv) cause us to recognize income or gain without a corresponding receipt of cash, (v) adversely affect the time as to when a purchase or sale of stock or securities is deemed to occur, (vi) adversely alter the characterization of certain complex financial transactions, and (vii) produce income that will not be qualifying income for purposes of the 90% Income Test. We will monitor our transactions and may make certain tax elections in order to mitigate the effect of these provisions.
We may invest in preferred securities or other securities the U.S. federal income tax treatment of which may be unclear or may be subject to recharacterization by the IRS. To the extent the tax treatment of such securities or the income from such securities differs from the expected tax treatment, it could affect the timing or character of income recognized, requiring us to purchase or sell securities, or otherwise change our portfolio, in order to comply with the tax rules applicable to RICs under the Code.
Taxation of U.S. Stockholders
Distributions by us generally are taxable to U.S. Stockholders as ordinary income or capital gains. Distributions of our "investment company taxable income" (which is, generally, our ordinary income plus realized net short-term capital gains in excess of realized net long-term capital losses) will be taxable as ordinary income to U.S. Stockholders to the extent of our current or accumulated earnings and profits, whether paid in cash or reinvested in additional common stock. Provided that certain holding period and other requirements are met, such distributions (if designated by us) may qualify (i) for the dividends received deduction available to corporations, but only to the extent that our income consists of dividend income from U.S. corporations and (ii) in the case of individual shareholders, as qualified dividend income eligible to be taxed at long-term capital gain rates to the extent that we receive qualified dividend income (generally, dividend income from taxable domestic corporations and certain qualified foreign corporations). There can be no assurance as to what portion, if any, of our distributions will qualify for favorable treatment as qualified dividend income.
Distributions of our net capital gain (which is generally our realized net long-term capital gains in excess of realized net short-term capital losses) properly designated by us as "capital gain dividends" will be taxable to a U.S. Stockholder as long-term capital gains, regardless of the U.S. Stockholder's holding period for its common stock and regardless of whether paid in cash or reinvested in additional common stock. Distributions in excess of our current and accumulated earnings and profits first will reduce a U.S. Stockholder's adjusted tax basis in such stockholder's common stock and, after the adjusted basis is reduced to zero, will constitute capital gains to such U.S. Stockholder.

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Although we currently intend to distribute any long-term capital gains at least annually, we may in the future decide to retain some or all of our long-term capital gains, and designate the retained amount as a "deemed distribution." In that case, among other consequences, we will pay tax on the retained amount, each U.S. Stockholder will be required to include his, her or its proportionate share of the deemed distribution in income as if it had been actually distributed to the U.S. Stockholder, and the U.S. Stockholder will be entitled to claim a credit equal to its allocable share of the tax paid thereon by us. The amount of the deemed distribution net of such tax will be added to the U.S. Stockholder's tax basis for his, her or its common stock. Since we expect to pay tax on any retained capital gains at our regular corporate tax rate, and since that rate is in excess of the maximum rate currently payable by individuals on long-term capital gains, the amount of tax that individual stockholders will be treated as having paid and for which they will receive a credit will exceed the tax they owe on the retained net capital gain. Such excess generally may be claimed as a credit against the U.S. Stockholder's other U.S. federal income tax obligations or may be refunded to the extent it exceeds a stockholder's liability for U.S. federal income tax. A stockholder that is not subject to U.S. federal income tax or otherwise required to file a U.S. federal income tax return would be required to file a U.S. federal income tax return on the appropriate form in order to claim a refund for the taxes we paid. In order to utilize the deemed distribution approach, we must provide written notice to our stockholders prior to the expiration of 60 days after the close of the relevant taxable year. We cannot treat any of our investment company taxable income as a "deemed distribution."
For purposes of determining (1) whether the Annual Distribution Requirement is satisfied for any year and (2) the amount of capital gain dividends paid for that year, we may, under certain circumstances, elect to treat a dividend that is paid during the following taxable year as if it had been paid during the taxable year in question. If we make such an election, the U.S. Stockholder will still be treated as receiving the dividend in the taxable year in which the distribution is made. However, any dividend declared by us in October, November or December of any calendar year, payable to stockholders of record on a specified date in any such month and actually paid during January of the following year, will be treated as if it had been received by our U.S. Stockholders on December 31 of the year in which the dividend was declared.
If a U.S. Stockholder purchases shares of our common stock shortly before the record date of a distribution, the price of the shares will include the value of the distribution and the investor will be subject to tax on the distribution even though it represents a return of its investment.
A U.S. Stockholder generally will recognize taxable gain or loss if such U.S. Stockholder sells or otherwise disposes of its shares of our common stock. Any gain or loss arising from such sale or taxable disposition generally will be treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the U.S. Stockholder has held his, her or its shares for more than one year. Otherwise, it would be classified as short-term capital gain or loss. However, any capital loss arising from the sale or taxable disposition of shares of our common stock held for six months or less will be treated as long-term capital loss to the extent of the amount of capital gain dividends received, or undistributed capital gain deemed received, with respect to such shares. In addition, all or a portion of any loss recognized upon a taxable disposition of shares of our common stock may be disallowed if other substantially identical shares are purchased (whether through reinvestment of distributions or otherwise) within 30 days before or after the disposition. Capital losses are deductible only to the extent of capital gains (subject to an exception for individuals under which a limited amount of capital losses may be offset against ordinary income).
In general, individual U.S. Stockholders currently are subject to a preferential rate on their net capital gain, or the excess of realized net long-term capital gain over realized net short-term capital loss for a taxable year, including long-term capital gain derived from an investment in our shares. Such rate is lower than the maximum rate on ordinary income currently payable by individuals. Corporate U.S. Stockholders currently are subject to U.S. federal income tax on net capital gain at ordinary income rates.
Certain U.S. Stockholders who are individuals, estates or trusts and whose income exceeds certain thresholds will be required to pay a 3.8% Medicare tax on all or a portion of their "net investment income," which includes dividends received from us and capital gains from the sale or other disposition of our stock.
We will make available to each of our U.S. Stockholders, as promptly as possible after the end of each calendar year, a notice detailing, on a per share basis, the amounts includible in such U.S. Stockholder's taxable income for such year as ordinary income and as long-term capital gain. In addition, the amount and the U.S. federal tax status of each year's distributions generally will be reported to the IRS. Distributions may also be subject to additional state, local and foreign taxes depending on a U.S. Stockholder's particular situation.

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Payments of dividends, including deemed payments of constructive dividends, or the proceeds of the sale or other taxable disposition of our common stock generally are subject to information reporting unless the U.S. Stockholder is an exempt recipient. Such payments may also be subject to U.S. federal backup withholding at the applicable rate if the recipient of such payment fails to supply a taxpayer identification number and otherwise comply with the rules for establishing an exemption from backup withholding. Backup withholding is not an additional tax, and any amounts withheld under the backup withholding rules generally will be allowed as a refund or credit against the holder's U.S. federal income tax liability, provided that certain information is provided timely to the IRS.
Taxation of Non-U.S. Stockholders
Whether an investment in our common stock is appropriate for a Non-U.S. Stockholder will depend upon that person's particular circumstances. An investment in our common stock by a Non-U.S. Stockholder may have adverse tax consequences. Non-U.S. Stockholders should consult their tax advisers before investing in our common stock.
Distributions of our "investment company taxable income" to Non-U.S. Stockholders that are not "effectively connected" with a U.S. trade or business conducted by the Non-U.S. Stockholder, will generally be subject to withholding of U.S. federal income tax at a rate of 30% (or lower applicable treaty rate) to the extent of our current and accumulated earnings and profits.
For our taxable years beginning before January 1, 2014 (and, if extended as has happened in the past, for taxable years covered by such extension), properly reported distributions to Non-U.S. Stockholders are generally exempt from U.S. federal withholding tax where they (i) are paid in respect of our "qualified net interest income" (generally, our U.S.-source interest income, other than certain contingent interest and interest from obligations of a corporation or partnership in which we are at least a 10% shareholder, reduced by expenses that are allocable to such income) or (ii) are paid in respect of our "qualified short-term capital gains" (generally, the excess of our net short-term capital gain over our long-term capital loss for such taxable year). There can be no assurance as to whether this provision will be extended. In addition, depending on our circumstances, we may report all, some or none of our potentially eligible dividends as such qualified net interest income or as qualified short-term capital gains, and/or treat such dividends, in whole or in part, as ineligible for this exemption from withholding. In order to qualify for this exemption from withholding, a Non-U.S. Stockholder needs to comply with applicable certification requirements relating to its non-U.S. status (including, in general, furnishing an IRS Form W-8BEN or substitute form). In the case of shares held through an intermediary, the intermediary may withhold even if we report the payment as qualified net interest income or qualified short-term capital gain. Non-U.S. Stockholders should contact their intermediaries with respect to the application of these rules to their accounts. There can be no assurance as to what portion of our distributions will qualify for favorable treatment as qualified net interest income or qualified short-term capital gains.
Actual or deemed distributions of our net capital gain to a Non-U.S. Stockholder, and gains recognized by a Non-U.S. Stockholder upon the sale of our common stock, that are not effectively connected with a U.S. trade or business conducted by the Non-U.S. Stockholder, will generally not be subject to U.S. federal withholding tax and generally will not be subject to U.S. federal income tax unless the Non-U.S. Stockholder is a nonresident alien individual and is physically present in the United States for 183 or more days during the taxable year and meets certain other requirements.
Distributions of our "investment company taxable income" and net capital gain (including deemed distributions) to Non-U.S. Stockholders, and gains realized by Non-U.S. Stockholders upon the sale of our common stock that are effectively connected with a U.S. trade or business conducted by the Non-U.S. Stockholder, will be subject to U.S. federal income tax at the graduated rates applicable to U.S. citizens, residents and domestic corporations. In addition, if such Non-U.S. Stockholder is a foreign corporation, it may also be subject to a 30% (or lower applicable treaty rate) branch profits tax on its effectively connected earnings and profits for the taxable year, subject to adjustments, if its investment in our common stock is effectively connected with its conduct of a U.S. trade or business.
If we distribute our net capital gain in the form of deemed rather than actual distributions (which we may do in the future), a Non-U.S. Stockholder will be entitled to a U.S. federal income tax credit or tax refund equal to the stockholder's allocable share of the tax we pay on the capital gains deemed to have been distributed. In order to obtain the refund, the Non-U.S. Stockholder must obtain a U.S. taxpayer identification number and file a U.S. federal income tax return even if the Non-U.S. Stockholder would not otherwise be required to obtain a U.S. taxpayer identification number or file a U.S. federal income tax return.
In addition, after June 30, 2014, withholding at a rate of 30% will be required on dividends in respect of, and after December 31, 2016, withholding at a rate of 30% will be required on gross proceeds from the sale of, shares of our stock held by or through certain foreign financial institutions (including investment funds), unless such institution enters into an agreement with the Secretary of the Treasury to report, on an annual basis, information with respect to interests in, and accounts maintained by, the institution to the extent such interests or accounts are held by certain U.S. persons or by certain non-U.S. entities that are wholly or partially owned by U.S. persons and to withhold on certain payments. Accordingly, the entity through which our shares are held will affect

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the determination of whether such withholding is required. An intergovernmental agreement between the United States and an applicable foreign country, or future Treasury regulations or other guidance, may modify these requirements. Similarly, dividends in respect of, and gross proceeds from the sale of, our shares held by an investor that is a non-financial non-U.S. entity that does not qualify under certain exemptions will be subject to withholding at a rate of 30%, unless such entity either (i) certifies to us that such entity does not have any "substantial United States owners" or (ii) provides certain information regarding the entity's "substantial United States owners," which we will in turn provide to the IRS. We will not pay any additional amounts to stockholders in respect of any amounts withheld. Non-U.S. Stockholders are encouraged to consult their tax advisors regarding the possible implications of the legislation on their investment in our shares.
A Non-U.S. Stockholder generally will be required to comply with certain certification procedures to establish that such holder is not a U.S. person in order to avoid backup withholding with respect to payments of dividends, including deemed payments of constructive dividends, or the proceeds of a disposition of our common stock. In addition, we are required to annually report to the IRS and each Non-U.S. Stockholder the amount of any dividends or constructive dividends treated as paid to such Non-U.S. Stockholder, regardless of whether any tax was actually withheld. Copies of the information returns reporting such dividend or constructive dividend payments and the amount withheld may also be made available to the tax authorities in the country in which a Non-U.S. Stockholder resides under the provisions of an applicable income tax treaty. Backup withholding is not an additional tax, and any amounts withheld under the backup withholding rules generally will be allowed as a refund or credit against a Non-U.S. Stockholder's U.S. federal income tax liability, if any, provided that certain required information is provided timely to the IRS.
Non-U.S. persons should consult their tax advisors with respect to the U.S. federal income tax and withholding tax, and state, local and foreign tax consequences of an investment in our common stock.
Failure to Obtain RIC Tax Treatment
If we were unable to obtain tax treatment as a RIC, we would be subject to tax on all of our taxable income at regular corporate rates. We would not be able to deduct distributions to stockholders, nor would they be required to be made. Distributions would generally be taxable to our stockholders as ordinary dividend income eligible for the reduced maximum rate applicable for qualified dividend income to the extent of our current and accumulated earnings and profits. Subject to certain limitations under the Code, corporate distributees would be eligible for the dividends-received deduction.
Distributions in excess of our current and accumulated earnings and profits would be treated first as a return of capital to the extent of the stockholder's tax basis, and any remaining distributions would be treated as a capital gain.
The discussion set forth herein does not constitute tax advice, and potential investors should consult their own tax advisors concerning the tax considerations relevant to their particular situation.
Regulation as a Business Development Company
General
We are a closed-end, non-diversified investment company that has filed an election to be treated as a BDC under the 1940 Act and has elected to be treated as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code. The 1940 Act contains prohibitions and restrictions relating to transactions between business development companies and their affiliates (including any investment advisers or sub-advisers), principal underwriters and affiliates of those affiliates or underwriters and requires that a majority of the directors be persons other than "interested persons," as that term is defined in the 1940 Act. In addition, the 1940 Act provides that we may not change the nature of our business so as to cease to be, or to withdraw our election as, a business development company unless approved by a majority of our outstanding voting securities.
We may invest up to 100% of our assets in securities acquired directly from issuers in privately negotiated transactions. With respect to such securities, we may, for the purpose of public resale, be deemed an "underwriter" as that term is defined in the Securities Act of 1933. Our intention is to not write (sell) or buy put or call options to manage risks associated with the publicly traded securities of our portfolio companies, except that we may enter into hedging transactions to manage the risks associated with interest rate and other market fluctuations. However, in connection with an investment or acquisition financing of a portfolio company, we may purchase or otherwise receive warrants to purchase the common stock of the portfolio company. Similarly, in connection with an acquisition, we may acquire rights to require the issuers of acquired securities or their affiliates to repurchase them under certain circumstances. We also do not intend to acquire securities issued by any investment company that exceed the limits imposed by the 1940 Act. Under these limits, except with respect to money market funds, we generally cannot acquire more than 3% of the voting stock of any regulated investment company, invest more than 5% of the value of our total assets in the securities of one investment company or invest more than 10% of the value of our total assets in the securities of more than one

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investment company. With regard to that portion of our portfolio invested in securities issued by investment companies, it should be noted that such investments subject our stockholders indirectly to additional expenses. None of these policies are fundamental and may be changed without stockholder approval.
Qualifying Assets
Under the 1940 Act, a business development company may not acquire any asset other than assets of the type listed in Section 55(a) of the 1940 Act, which are referred to as qualifying assets, unless, at the time the acquisition is made, qualifying assets represent at least 70% of the company's total assets. The principal categories of qualifying assets relevant to our business are the following:
1.
Securities purchased in transactions not involving any public offering from the issuer of such securities, which issuer (subject to certain limited exceptions) is an eligible portfolio company, or from any person who is, or has been during the preceding 13 months, an affiliated person of an eligible portfolio company, or from any other person, subject to such rules as may be prescribed by the SEC. An "eligible portfolio company" is defined in the 1940 Act and rules adopted pursuant thereto as any issuer which:
a.
is organized under the laws of, and has its principal place of business in, the United States;
b.
is not an investment company (other than a small business investment company wholly owned by the business development company) or a company that would be an investment company but for certain exclusions under the 1940 Act for certain financial companies such as banks, brokers, commercial finance companies, mortgage companies and insurance companies; and
c.
satisfies any of the following:
i.
does not have any class of securities with respect to which a broker or dealer may extend margin credit;
ii.
is controlled by a business development company or a group of companies including a business development company and the business development company has an affiliated person who is a director of the eligible portfolio company;
iii.
is a small and solvent company having total assets of not more than $4 million and capital and surplus of not less than $2 million;
iv.
does not have any class of securities listed on a national securities exchange; or
v.
has a class of securities listed on a national securities exchange, but has an aggregate market value of outstanding voting and non-voting common equity of less than $250 million.
2.
Securities in companies that were eligible portfolio companies when we made our initial investment if certain other requirements are satisfied.
3.
Securities of any eligible portfolio company which we control.
4.
Securities purchased in a private transaction from a U.S. issuer that is not an investment company or from an affiliated person of the issuer, or in transactions incident thereto, if the issuer is in bankruptcy and subject to reorganization or if the issuer, immediately prior to the purchase of its securities was unable to meet its obligations as they came due without material assistance other than conventional lending or financing agreements.
5.
Securities of an eligible portfolio company purchased from any person in a private transaction if there is no ready market for such securities and we already own 60% of the outstanding equity of the eligible portfolio company.
6.
Securities received in exchange for or distributed on or with respect to securities described in (1) through (4) above, or pursuant to the exercise of warrants or rights relating to such securities.
7.
Cash, cash equivalents, U.S. government securities or high-quality debt securities maturing in one year or less from the time of investment.
In addition, a business development company must have been organized and have its principal place of business in the United States and must be operated for the purpose of making investments in the types of securities described in (1), (2), (3) or (4) above.

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Managerial Assistance to Portfolio Companies
In order to count portfolio securities as qualifying assets for the purpose of the 70% test, a business development company must either control the issuer of the securities or must offer to make available to the issuer of the securities (other than small and solvent companies described above) significant managerial assistance; except that, where the business development company purchases such securities in conjunction with one or more other persons acting together, one of the other persons in the group may make available such managerial assistance. "Making available significant managerial assistance" refers to any arrangement whereby we provide significant guidance and counsel concerning the management, operations, or business objectives and policies of a portfolio company. We are also deemed to be providing managerial assistance to all portfolio companies that we control, either by ourselves or in conjunction with others. The nature and extent of significant managerial assistance provided by us will vary according to the particular needs of each portfolio company. Examples of such activities include advice on marketing, operations, fulfillment and overall strategy, capital budgeting, managing relationships with financing sources, recruiting management personnel, evaluating acquisition and divestiture opportunities, participating in board and management meetings, consulting with and advising officers of portfolio companies, and providing other organizational and financial guidance. We provide significant managerial assistance to all portfolio companies that we control, either by ourselves or in conjunction with others. Prospect Administration provides such managerial assistance on our behalf to portfolio companies, including controlled companies, when we are required to provide this assistance, utilizing personnel from Prospect Capital Management.
Temporary Investments
Pending investment in other types of "qualifying assets," as described above, our investments may consist of cash, cash equivalents, including money market funds, U.S. government securities or high quality debt securities maturing in one year or less from the time of investment, which we refer to, collectively, as temporary investments, so that 70% of our assets are qualifying assets. Typically, we will invest in money market funds, U.S. Treasury bills or in repurchase agreements that are fully collateralized by cash or securities issued by the U.S. government or its agencies. A repurchase agreement involves the purchase by an investor, such as us, of a specified security and the simultaneous agreement by the seller to repurchase it at an agreed upon future date and at a price which is greater than the purchase price by an amount that reflects an agreed-upon interest rate. There is no percentage restriction on the proportion of our assets that may be invested in such repurchase agreements. However, if more than 25% of our total assets constitute repurchase agreements from a single counterparty, we would not meet the Diversification Tests in order to qualify as a RIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Thus, we do not intend to enter into repurchase agreements with a single counterparty in excess of this limit. The Investment Adviser will monitor the creditworthiness of the counterparties with which we enter into repurchase agreement transactions.
Senior Securities
We are permitted, under specified conditions, to issue multiple classes of indebtedness and one class of stock senior to our common stock if our asset coverage, as defined in the 1940 Act, is at least equal to 200% immediately after each such issuance. In addition, while any preferred stock or public debt securities remain outstanding, we must make provisions to prohibit any distribution to our stockholders or the repurchase of such securities or shares unless we meet the applicable asset coverage ratios after giving effect to such distribution or repurchase. We may also borrow amounts up to 5% of the value of our total assets for temporary or emergency purposes without regard to asset coverage. For a discussion of the risks associated with leverage, see "Risk Factors – Risks Relating to Our Securities."
Code of Ethics
We, Prospect Capital Management and Prospect Administration have each adopted a code of ethics pursuant to Rule 17j-1 under the 1940 Act that establishes procedures for personal investments and restricts certain personal securities transactions. Personnel subject to each code may invest in securities for their personal investment accounts, including securities that may be purchased or held by us, so long as such investments are made in accordance with the code's requirements. For information on how to obtain a copy of each code of ethics, see "Available Information."
Compliance Policies and Procedures
We and the Investment Adviser have adopted and implemented written policies and procedures reasonably designed to prevent violation of the U.S. federal securities laws and are required to review these compliance policies and procedures annually for their adequacy and the effectiveness of their implementation and to designate a Chief Compliance Officer to be responsible for administering the policies and procedures. Brian H. Oswald serves as our Chief Compliance Officer.

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Proxy Voting Policies and Procedures
We have delegated our proxy voting responsibility to Prospect Capital Management. The Proxy Voting Policies and Procedures of Prospect Capital Management are set forth below. The guidelines are reviewed periodically by Prospect Capital Management and our independent directors, and, accordingly, are subject to change.
Introduction.    As an investment adviser registered under the Advisers Act, Prospect Capital Management has a fiduciary duty to act solely in the best interests of its clients. As part of this duty, Prospect Capital Management recognizes that it must vote client securities in a timely manner free of conflicts of interest and in the best interests of its clients.
These policies and procedures for voting proxies for Prospect Capital Management's Investment Advisory clients are intended to comply with Section 206 of, and Rule 206(4)-6 under, the Advisers Act.
Proxy policies.    These policies are designed to be responsive to the wide range of subjects that may be the subject of a proxy vote. These policies are not exhaustive due to the variety of proxy voting issues that Prospect Capital Management may be required to consider. In general, Prospect Capital Management will vote proxies in accordance with these guidelines unless: (1) Prospect Capital Management has determined to consider the matter on a case-by-case basis (as is stated in these guidelines), (2) the subject matter of the vote is not covered by these guidelines, (3) a material conflict of interest is present, or (4) Prospect Capital Management might find it necessary to vote contrary to its general guidelines to maximize stockholder value and vote in its clients' best interests. In such cases, a decision on how to vote will be made by the Proxy Voting Committee (as described below). In reviewing proxy issues, Prospect Capital Management will apply the following general policies:
Elections of directors.    In general, Prospect Capital Management will vote in favor of the management-proposed slate of directors. If there is a proxy fight for seats on the Board of Directors or Prospect Capital Management determines that there are other compelling reasons for withholding votes for directors, the Proxy Voting Committee will determine the appropriate vote on the matter. Prospect Capital Management believes that directors have a duty to respond to stockholder actions that have received significant stockholder support. Prospect Capital Management may withhold votes for directors that fail to act on key issues such as failure to implement proposals to declassify boards, failure to implement a majority vote requirement, failure to submit a rights plan to a stockholder vote and failure to act on tender offers where a majority of stockholders have tendered their shares. Finally, Prospect Capital Management may withhold votes for directors of non-U.S. issuers where there is insufficient information about the nominees disclosed in the proxy statement.
Appointment of auditors.    Prospect Capital Management believes that the company remains in the best position to choose the auditors and will generally support management's recommendation.
Changes in capital structure.    Changes in a company's charter, articles of incorporation or by-laws may be required by state or U.S. federal regulation. In general, Prospect Capital Management will cast its votes in accordance with the company's management on such proposal. However, the Proxy Voting Committee will review and analyze on a case-by-case basis any proposals regarding changes in corporate structure that are not required by state or U.S. federal regulation.
Corporate restructurings, mergers and acquisitions.    Prospect Capital Management believes proxy votes dealing with corporate reorganizations are an extension of the investment decision. Accordingly, the Proxy Voting Committee will analyze such proposals on a case-by-case basis.
Proposals affecting the rights of stockholders.    Prospect Capital Management will generally vote in favor of proposals that give stockholders a greater voice in the affairs of the company and oppose any measure that seeks to limit those rights. However, when analyzing such proposals, Prospect Capital Management will weigh the financial impact of the proposal against the impairment of the rights of stockholders.
Corporate governance.    Prospect Capital Management recognizes the importance of good corporate governance in ensuring that management and the Board of Directors fulfill their obligations to the stockholders. Prospect Capital Management favors proposals promoting transparency and accountability within a company.
Anti-takeover measures.    The Proxy Voting Committee will evaluate, on a case-by-case basis, proposals regarding anti-takeover measures to determine the measure's likely effect on stockholder value dilution.
Stock splits.    Prospect Capital Management will generally vote with the management of the company on stock split matters.
Limited liability of directors.    Prospect Capital Management will generally vote with management on matters that would affect the limited liability of directors.

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Social and corporate responsibility.    The Proxy Voting Committee may review and analyze on a case-by-case basis proposals relating to social, political and environmental issues to determine whether they will have a financial impact on stockholder value. Prospect Capital Management may abstain from voting on social proposals that do not have a readily determinable financial impact on stockholder value.
Proxy voting procedures.    Prospect Capital Management will generally vote proxies in accordance with these guidelines. In circumstances in which (1) Prospect Capital Management has determined to consider the matter on a case-by-case basis (as is stated in these guidelines), (2) the subject matter of the vote is not covered by these guidelines, (3) a material conflict of interest is present, or (4) Prospect Capital Management might find it necessary to vote contrary to its general guidelines to maximize stockholder value and vote in its clients' best interests, the Proxy Voting Committee will vote the proxy.
Proxy voting committee.    Prospect Capital Management has formed a proxy voting committee to establish general proxy policies and consider specific proxy voting matters as necessary. In addition, members of the committee may contact the management of the company and interested stockholder groups as necessary to discuss proxy issues. Members of the committee will include relevant senior personnel. The committee may also evaluate proxies where we face a potential conflict of interest (as discussed below). Finally, the committee monitors adherence to guidelines, and reviews the policies contained in this statement from time to time.
Conflicts of interest.    Prospect Capital Management recognizes that there may be a potential conflict of interest when it votes a proxy solicited by an issuer that is its advisory client or a client or customer of one of our affiliates or with whom it has another business or personal relationship that may affect how it votes on the issuer's proxy. Prospect Capital Management believes that adherence to these policies and procedures ensures that proxies are voted with only its clients' best interests in mind. To ensure that its votes are not the product of a conflict of interests, Prospect Capital Management requires that: (i) anyone involved in the decision making process (including members of the Proxy Voting Committee) disclose to the chairman of the Proxy Voting Committee any potential conflict that he or she is aware of and any contact that he or she has had with any interested party regarding a proxy vote; and (ii) employees involved in the decision making process or vote administration are prohibited from revealing how Prospect Capital Management intends to vote on a proposal in order to reduce any attempted influence from interested parties.
Proxy voting.    Each account's custodian will forward all relevant proxy materials to Prospect Capital Management, either electronically or in physical form to the address of record that Prospect Capital Management has provided to the custodian.
Proxy recordkeeping.    Prospect Capital Management must retain the following documents pertaining to proxy voting:
copies of its proxy voting policies and procedures;
copies of all proxy statements;
records of all votes cast by Prospect Capital Management;
copies of all documents created by Prospect Capital Management that were material to making a decision how to vote proxies or that memorializes the basis for that decision; and
copies of all written client requests for information with regard to how Prospect Capital Management voted proxies on behalf of the client as well as any written responses provided.
All of the above-referenced records will be maintained and preserved for a period of not less than five years from the end of the fiscal year during which the last entry was made. The first two years of records must be maintained at our office.
Proxy voting records.    Clients may obtain information about how Prospect Capital Management voted proxies on their behalf by making a written request for proxy voting information to: Compliance Officer, Prospect Capital Management LLC, 10 East 40th Street, 42nd Floor, New York, NY 10016.
Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 imposes a variety of regulatory requirements on publicly-held companies. In addition to our Chief Executive and Chief Financial Officers' required certifications as to the accuracy of our financial reporting, we are also required to disclose the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as well as report on our assessment of our internal controls over financial reporting, the latter of which must be audited by our independent registered public accounting firm.
The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 also requires us to continually review our policies and procedures to ensure that we remain in compliance with all rules promulgated thereunder.

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Available Information
We file with or submit to the SEC annual, quarterly and current periodic reports, proxy statements and other information meeting the informational requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"). This information is available free of charge by contacting us at (212) 448-0702 or on our website at www.prospectstreet.com. Information contained on our website is not incorporated into this Annual Report and you should not consider such information to be part of this Annual Report. You also may inspect and copy these reports, proxy statements and other information, as well as the Annual Report and related exhibits and schedules, at the Public Reference Room of the SEC at 100 F Street NE, Washington, D.C. 20549. Such information is also available from the EDGAR database on the SEC's website at http://www.sec.gov. You also can obtain copies of such information, after paying a duplicating fee, by sending a request by e-mail to publicinfo@sec.gov or by writing the SEC's Public Reference Branch, Office of Consumer Affairs and Information Services, Securities and Exchange Commission, Washington, D.C. 20549. You may obtain information on the operation of the SEC's Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at (202) 551-8090 or (800) SEC-0330.
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Investing in our securities involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the risks described below, together with all of the other information included in this report, before you decide whether to make an investment in our securities. The risks set forth below are not the only risks we face. If any of the adverse events or conditions described below occurs, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected. In such case, our NAV, and the trading price of our common stock could decline, or the value of our preferred stock, debt securities, and warrants, if any are outstanding, may decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment.
Forward-Looking Statements
Our annual report on Form l0-K for the year ended June 30, 2014, any of our quarterly reports on Form 10-Q or current reports on Form 8-K, or any other oral or written statements made in press releases or otherwise by or on behalf of Prospect Capital Corporation may contain forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Section 21E of the Exchange Act, which involve certain risks and uncertainties. Forward-looking statements predict or describe our future operations, business plans, business and investment strategies and portfolio management and the performance of our investments and our investment management business. These forward-looking statements are identified by their use of such terms and phrases as "intends," "intend," "intended," "goal," "estimate," "estimates," "expects," "expect," "expected," "project," "projected," "projections," "plans," "seeks," "anticipates," "anticipated," "should," "could," "may," "will," "designed to," "foreseeable future," "believe," "believes," "scheduled" and similar expressions. Our actual results or outcomes may differ materially from those anticipated. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date the statement was made. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.
Our actual results may differ significantly from any results expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Some, but not all, of the factors that might cause such a difference include, but are not limited to:
our future operating results;
our business prospects and the prospects of our portfolio companies;
the impact of investments that we expect to make;
our contractual arrangements and relationships with third parties;
the dependence of our future success on the general economy and its impact on the industries in which we invest;
the ability of our portfolio companies to achieve their objectives;
difficulty in obtaining financing or raising capital, especially in the current credit and equity environment;
the level and volatility of prevailing interest rates and credit spreads, magnified by the current turmoil in the credit markets;
adverse developments in the availability of desirable loan and investment opportunities whether they are due to competition, regulation or otherwise;
a compression of the yield on our investments and the cost of our liabilities, as well as the level of leverage available to us;

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our regulatory structure and tax treatment, including our ability to operate as a business development company and a regulated investment company;
the adequacy of our cash resources and working capital;
the timing of cash flows, if any, from the operations of our portfolio companies;
the ability of the Investment Adviser to locate suitable investments for us and to monitor and administer our investments;
authoritative generally accepted accounting principles or policy changes from such standard-setting bodies as the Financial Accounting Standards Board, the Securities and Exchange Commission, Internal Revenue Service, the NASDAQ Global Select Market, and other authorities that we are subject to, as well as their counterparts in any foreign jurisdictions where we might do business; and
the risk factors set forth below.
Risks Relating to Our Business
Capital markets could experience a period of disruption and instability. Such market conditions have historically and could again have a material and adverse effect on debt and equity capital markets in the United States and abroad, which could have a materially negative impact on our business and operations.
Global capital markets have periodically experienced periods of instability as evidenced by the extended disruptions from 2007 to 2010 in liquidity in the debt capital markets, significant losses in the principal value of investments, the re-pricing of credit risk in the markets and the failure of certain major financial institutions. Such conditions may occur for a prolonged period of time. These market conditions have historically and could again have a material adverse effect on debt and equity capital markets in the United States and Europe, which could have a materially negative impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations. We and other companies in the financial services sector may have to access, if available, alternative markets for debt and equity capital. In such circumstances, equity capital may be difficult to raise because subject to some limited exceptions, as a BDC, we are generally not able to issue additional shares of our common stock at a price less than net asset value without general approval by our stockholders, which we currently have, and approval of the specific issuance by our Board of Directors. In addition, our ability to incur indebtedness or issue preferred stock is limited by applicable regulations such that our asset coverage, as defined in the 1940 Act, must equal at least 200% immediately after each time we incur indebtedness or issue preferred stock. The debt capital that may be available, if at all, may be at a higher cost and on less favorable terms and conditions in the future. Any inability to raise capital could have a negative effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Market conditions may in the future make it difficult to extend the maturity of or refinance our existing indebtedness, including the final maturity of our credit facility in March 2015, and any failure to do so could have a material adverse effect on our business. The illiquidity of our investments may make it difficult for us to sell such investments if required. As a result, we may realize significantly less than the value at which we have recorded our investments.
Given the extreme volatility and dislocation that the capital markets have historically experienced, many BDCs have faced, and may in the future face, a challenging environment in which to raise capital. We may in the future have difficulty accessing debt and equity capital, and a severe disruption in the global financial markets or deterioration in credit and financing conditions could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, significant changes in the capital markets, including the extreme volatility and disruption, have had, and may in the future have, a negative effect on the valuations of our investments and on the potential for liquidity events involving our investments. An inability to raise capital, and any required sale of our investments for liquidity purposes, could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition or results of operations. The Investment Adviser does not know how long the financial markets will continue to be affected by these events and cannot predict the effects of these or similar events in the future on the United States economy and securities markets or on our investments. The Investment Adviser monitors developments and seeks to manage our investments in a manner consistent with achieving our investment objective, but there can be no assurance that it will be successful in doing so; and the Investment Adviser may not timely anticipate or manage existing, new or additional risks, contingencies or developments, including regulatory developments in the current or future market environment.
We are required to record certain of our assets at fair value, as determined in good faith by our Board of Directors in accordance with our valuation policy. As a result, volatility in the capital markets may have a material adverse effect on our investment valuations and our net asset value, even if we plan to hold investments to maturity.

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Uncertainty about the financial stability of the United States and of several countries in the European Union (EU) could have a significant adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Due to federal budget deficit concerns, S&P downgraded the federal government's credit rating from AAA to AA+ for the first time in history on August 5, 2011. Further, Moody's and Fitch have warned that they may downgrade the federal government's credit rating. Further downgrades or warnings by S&P or other rating agencies, and the United States government's credit and deficit concerns in general, including issues around the federal debt ceiling, could cause interest rates and borrowing costs to rise, which may negatively impact both the perception of credit risk associated with our debt portfolio and our ability to access the debt markets on favorable terms. In addition, a decreased credit rating could create broader financial turmoil and uncertainty, which may weigh heavily on our financial performance and the value of our common stock.
In 2010, a financial crisis emerged in Europe, triggered by high budget deficits and rising direct and contingent sovereign debt in Greece, Ireland, Italy, Portugal and Spain, which created concerns about the debt crisis in Europe or any similar crisis could have a detrimental impact on the global economic recovery, sovereign and non-sovereign debt in these countries and the financial condition of European financial institutions. Market and economic disruptions have affected, and may in the future affect, consumer confidence levels and spending, personal bankruptcy rates, levels of incurrence and default on consumer debt and home prices, among other factors. We cannot assure you that market disruptions in Europe, including the increased cost of funding for certain governments and financial institutions, will not impact the global economy, and we cannot assure you that assistance packages will be available, or if available, be sufficient to stabilize countries and markets in Europe or elsewhere affected by a financial crisis. To the extent uncertainty regarding any economic recovery in Europe negatively impacts consumer confidence and consumer credit factors, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be significantly and adversely affected.
On December 18, 2013, the Federal Reserve announced that it would scale back its bond-buying program, or quantitative easing, which was designed to stimulate the economy and expand the Federal Reserve's holdings of long-term securities until key economic indicators, such as the unemployment rate, show signs of improvement. The Federal Reserve signaled it would reduce its purchases of long-term Treasury bonds and would scale back on its purchases of mortgage-backed securities. It is unclear what effect, if any, the incremental reduction in the rate of the Federal Reserve's monthly purchases will have on the value of our investments. However, it is possible that absent continued quantitative easing by the Federal Reserve, these developments, along with the United States government's federal debt ceiling issues and the European sovereign debt crisis, could cause interest rates and borrowing costs to rise, which may negatively impact our ability to access the debt markets on favorable terms.
We may suffer credit losses.
Investment in small and middle-market companies is highly speculative and involves a high degree of risk of credit loss. These risks are likely to increase during volatile economic periods. See "Risks Related to Our Investments."
Our financial condition and results of operations will depend on our ability to manage our future growth effectively.
Prospect Capital Management has been registered as an investment adviser since March 31, 2004, and we have been organized as a closed-end investment company since April 13, 2004. Our ability to achieve our investment objective depends on our ability to grow, which depends, in turn, on the Investment Adviser's ability to continue to identify, analyze, invest in and monitor companies that meet our investment criteria. Accomplishing this result on a cost-effective basis is largely a function of the Investment Adviser's structuring of investments, its ability to provide competent, attentive and efficient services to us and our access to financing on acceptable terms. As we continue to grow, Prospect Capital Management will need to continue to hire, train, supervise and manage new employees. Failure to manage our future growth effectively could have a materially adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We are dependent upon Prospect Capital Management's key management personnel for our future success.
We depend on the diligence, skill and network of business contacts of the senior management of the Investment Adviser. We also depend, to a significant extent, on the Investment Adviser's access to the investment professionals and the information and deal flow generated by these investment professionals in the course of their investment and portfolio management activities. The senior management team of the Investment Adviser evaluates, negotiates, structures, closes, monitors and services our investments. Our success depends to a significant extent on the continued service of the senior management team, particularly John F. Barry III and M. Grier Eliasek. The departure of any of the senior management team could have a materially adverse effect on our ability to achieve our investment objective. In addition, we can offer no assurance that Prospect Capital Management will remain the Investment Adviser or that we will continue to have access to its investment professionals or its information and deal flow.

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We operate in a highly competitive market for investment opportunities.
A number of entities compete with us to make the types of investments that we make in middle-market companies. We compete with other BDCs, public and private funds, commercial and investment banks, commercial financing companies, insurance companies, hedge funds, and, to the extent they provide an alternative form of financing, private equity funds. Many of our competitors are substantially larger and have considerably greater financial, technical and marketing resources than we do. Some competitors may have a lower cost of funds and access to funding sources that are not available to us. In addition, some of our competitors may have higher risk tolerances or different risk assessments, which could allow them to consider a wider variety of investments and establish more relationships than us. Furthermore, many of our competitors are not subject to the regulatory restrictions that the 1940 Act imposes on us as a BDC and that the Code imposes on us as a RIC. We cannot assure you that the competitive pressures we face will not have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Also, as a result of this competition, we may not be able to pursue attractive investment opportunities from time to time.
We do not seek to compete primarily based on the interest rates we offer and we believe that some of our competitors may make loans with interest rates that are comparable to or lower than the rates we offer. Rather, we compete with our competitors based on our existing investment platform, seasoned investment professionals, experience and focus on middle-market companies, disciplined investment philosophy, extensive industry focus and flexible transaction structuring.
We may lose investment opportunities if we do not match our competitors' pricing, terms and structure. If we match our competitors' pricing, terms and structure, we may experience decreased net interest income and increased risk of credit loss. As a result of operating in such a competitive environment, we may make investments that are on less favorable terms than what we may have originally anticipated, which may impact our return on these investments.
We fund a portion of our investments with borrowed money, which magnifies the potential for gain or loss on amounts invested and may increase the risk of investing in us.
Borrowings and other types of financing, also known as leverage, magnify the potential for gain or loss on amounts invested and, therefore, increase the risks associated with investing in our securities. Our lenders have fixed dollar claims on our assets that are superior to the claims of our common stockholders or any preferred stockholders. If the value of our assets increases, then leveraging would cause the net asset value to increase more sharply than it would have had we not leveraged. Conversely, if the value of our assets decreases, leveraging would cause net asset value to decline more sharply than it otherwise would have had we not leveraged. Similarly, any increase in our income in excess of consolidated interest payable on the borrowed funds would cause our net income to increase more than it would without the leverage, while any decrease in our income would cause net income to decline more sharply than it would have had we not borrowed. Such a decline could negatively affect our ability to make common stock dividend payments. Leverage is generally considered a speculative investment technique.
Changes in interest rates may affect our cost of capital and net investment income.
A portion of the debt investments we make bears interest at fixed rates and other debt investments bear interest at variable rates with floors and the value of these investments could be negatively affected by increases in market interest rates. In addition, as the interest rate on our revolving credit facility is at a variable rate based on an index, an increase in interest rates would make it more expensive to use debt to finance our investments. As a result, an increase in market interest rates could both reduce the value of our portfolio investments and increase our cost of capital, which could reduce our net investment income or net increase in net assets resulting from operations.
We need to raise additional capital to grow because we must distribute most of our income.
We need additional capital to fund growth in our investments. A reduction in the availability of new capital could limit our ability to grow. We must distribute at least 90% of our ordinary income and realized net short-term capital gains in excess of realized net long-term capital losses, if any, to our stockholders to maintain our status as a regulated investment company, or RIC, for U.S. federal income tax purposes. As a result, such earnings are not available to fund investment originations. We have sought additional capital by borrowing from financial institutions and may issue debt securities or additional equity securities. If we fail to obtain funds from such sources or from other sources to fund our investments, we could be limited in our ability to grow, which may have an adverse effect on the value of our common stock. In addition, as a business development company, we generally may not borrow money or issue debt securities or issue preferred stock unless immediately thereafter our ratio of total assets to total borrowings and other senior securities is at least 200%. This may restrict our ability to obtain additional leverage in certain circumstances.

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We may experience fluctuations in our quarterly results.
We could experience fluctuations in our quarterly operating results due to a number of factors, including the level of structuring fees received, the interest or dividend rates payable on the debt or equity securities we hold, the default rate on debt securities, the level of our expenses, variations in and the timing of the recognition of realized and unrealized gains or losses, the degree to which we encounter competition in our markets, and general economic conditions. As a result of these factors, results for any period should not be relied upon as being indicative of performance in future periods.
Our most recent NAV was calculated on June 30, 2014 and our NAV when calculated effective September 30, 2014 and thereafter may be higher or lower.
Our most recently estimated NAV per share is $10.56 determined by us as of June 30, 2014. NAV per share as of September 30, 2014 may be higher or lower than $10.56 based on potential changes in valuations, issuances of securities, dividends paid and earnings for the quarter then ended. Our Board of Directors has not yet determined the fair value of portfolio investments at any date subsequent to June 30, 2014. Our Board of Directors determines the fair value of our portfolio investments on a quarterly basis in connection with the preparation of quarterly financial statements and based on input from independent valuation firms, the Investment Adviser, the Administrator and the Audit Committee of our Board of Directors.
The Investment Adviser's liability is limited under the Investment Advisory Agreement, and we are required to indemnify the Investment Adviser against certain liabilities, which may lead the Investment Adviser to act in a riskier manner on our behalf than it would when acting for its own account.
The Investment Adviser has not assumed any responsibility to us other than to render the services described in the Investment Advisory Agreement, and it will not be responsible for any action of our Board of Directors in declining to follow the Investment Adviser's advice or recommendations. Pursuant to the Investment Advisory Agreement, the Investment Adviser and its members and their respective officers, managers, partners, agents, employees, controlling persons and members and any other person or entity affiliated with it will not be liable to us for their acts under the Investment Advisory Agreement, absent willful misfeasance, bad faith, gross negligence or reckless disregard in the performance of their duties. We have agreed to indemnify, defend and protect the Investment Adviser and its members and their respective officers, managers, partners, agents, employees, controlling persons and members and any other person or entity affiliated with it with respect to all damages, liabilities, costs and expenses resulting from acts of the Investment Adviser not arising out of willful misfeasance, bad faith, gross negligence or reckless disregard in the performance of their duties under the Investment Advisory Agreement. These protections may lead the Investment Adviser to act in a riskier manner when acting on our behalf than it would when acting for its own account.
Potential conflicts of interest could impact our investment returns.
Our executive officers and directors, and the executive officers of the Investment Adviser, may serve as officers, directors or principals of entities that operate in the same or related lines of business as we do or of investment funds managed by our affiliates. Accordingly, they may have obligations to investors in those entities, the fulfillment of which might not be in our best interests or those of our stockholders. Nevertheless, it is possible that new investment opportunities that meet our investment objective may come to the attention of one of these entities in connection with another investment advisory client or program, and, if so, such opportunity might not be offered, or otherwise made available, to us. However, as an investment adviser, Prospect Capital Management has a fiduciary obligation to act in the best interests of its clients, including us. To that end, if Prospect Capital Management or its affiliates manage any additional investment vehicles or client accounts in the future, Prospect Capital Management will endeavor to allocate investment opportunities in a fair and equitable manner over time so as not to discriminate unfairly against any client. If Prospect Capital Management chooses to establish another investment fund in the future, when the investment professionals of Prospect Capital Management identify an investment, they will have to choose which investment fund should make the investment.
In the course of our investing activities, under the Investment Advisory Agreement we pay base management and incentive fees to Prospect Capital Management and reimburse Prospect Capital Management for certain expenses it incurs. As a result of the Investment Advisory Agreement, there may be times when the senior management team of Prospect Capital Management has interests that differ from those of our stockholders, giving rise to a conflict.
The Investment Adviser receives a quarterly income incentive fee based, in part, on our pre-incentive fee net investment income, if any, for the immediately preceding calendar quarter. This income incentive fee is subject to a fixed quarterly hurdle rate before providing an income incentive fee return to Prospect Capital Management. This fixed hurdle rate was determined when then current interest rates were relatively low on a historical basis. Thus, if interest rates rise, it would become easier for our investment income to exceed the hurdle rate and, as a result, more likely that Prospect Capital Management will receive an income incentive fee than

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if interest rates on our investments remained constant or decreased. Subject to the receipt of any requisite stockholder approval under the 1940 Act, our Board of Directors may adjust the hurdle rate by amending the Investment Advisory Agreement.
The income incentive fee payable by us is computed and paid on income that may include interest that has been accrued but not yet received in cash. If a portfolio company defaults on a loan that has a deferred interest feature, it is possible that interest accrued under such loan that has previously been included in the calculation of the income incentive fee will become uncollectible. If this happens, we will reverse the interest that was recorded but Prospect Capital Management is not required to reimburse us for any such income incentive fee payments that were received in the past but would reduce the current period incentive fee for the effects of the reversal, if any. If we do not have sufficient liquid assets to pay this incentive fee or distributions to stockholders on such accrued income, we may be required to liquidate assets in order to do so. This fee structure could give rise to a conflict of interest for Prospect Capital Management to the extent that it may encourage Prospect Capital Management to favor debt financings that provide for deferred interest, rather than current cash payments of interest.
We have entered into a royalty-free license agreement with Prospect Capital Management. Under this agreement, Prospect Capital Management agrees to grant us a non-exclusive license to use the name "Prospect Capital." Under the license agreement, we have the right to use the "Prospect Capital" name for so long as Prospect Capital Management or one of its affiliates remains our investment adviser. In addition, we rent office space from Prospect Administration, an affiliate of Prospect Capital Management, and pay Prospect Administration our allocable portion of overhead and other expenses incurred by Prospect Administration in performing its obligations as Administrator under the Administration Agreement, including rent and our allocable portion of the costs of our Chief Financial Officer and Chief Compliance Officer and their respective staffs. This may create conflicts of interest that our Board of Directors monitors.
Our incentive fee could induce Prospect Capital Management to make speculative investments.
The incentive fee payable by us to Prospect Capital Management may create an incentive for the Investment Adviser to make investments on our behalf that are more speculative or involve more risk than would be the case in the absence of such compensation arrangement. The way in which the incentive fee payable is determined (calculated as a percentage of the return on invested capital) may encourage the Investment Adviser to use leverage to increase the return on our investments. Increased use of leverage and this increased risk of replacement of that leverage at maturity would increase the likelihood of default, which would disfavor holders of our common stock. Similarly, because the Investment Adviser will receive an incentive fee based, in part, upon net capital gains realized on our investments, the Investment Adviser may invest more than would otherwise be appropriate in companies whose securities are likely to yield capital gains, as compared to income producing securities. Such a practice could result in our investing in more speculative securities than would otherwise be the case, which could result in higher investment losses, particularly during economic downturns.
The incentive fee payable by us to Prospect Capital Management could create an incentive for the Investment Adviser to invest on our behalf in instruments, such as zero coupon bonds, that have a deferred interest feature. Under these investments, we would accrue interest income over the life of the investment but would not receive payments in cash on the investment until the end of the term. Our net investment income used to calculate the income incentive fee, however, includes accrued interest. For example, accrued interest, if any, on our investments in zero coupon bonds will be included in the calculation of our incentive fee, even though we will not receive any cash interest payments in respect of payment on the bond until its maturity date. Thus, a portion of this incentive fee would be based on income that we may not have yet received in cash in the event of default may never receive.
We may be obligated to pay our Investment Adviser incentive compensation even if we incur a loss.
The Investment Adviser is entitled to incentive compensation for each fiscal quarter based, in part, on our pre-incentive fee net investment income if any, for the immediately preceding calendar quarter above a performance threshold for that quarter. Accordingly, since the performance threshold is based on a percentage of our net asset value, decreases in our net asset value make it easier to achieve the performance threshold. Our pre-incentive fee net investment income for incentive compensation purposes excludes realized and unrealized capital losses or depreciation that we may incur in the fiscal quarter, even if such capital losses or depreciation result in a net loss on our statement of operations for that quarter. Thus, we may be required to pay the Investment Adviser incentive compensation for a fiscal quarter even if there is a decline in the value of our portfolio or we incur a net loss for that quarter.
The Investment Adviser and Administrator have the right to resign on 60 days' notice, and we may not be able to find a suitable replacement within that time, resulting in a disruption in our operations that could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
The Investment Adviser and Administrator have the right, under the Investment Advisory Agreement and Administration Agreement, respectively, to resign at any time upon not less than 60 days' written notice, whether we have found a replacement

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or not. If the Investment Adviser or Administrator resigns, we may not be able to find a replacement or hire internal management or administration with similar expertise and ability to provide the same or equivalent services on acceptable terms within 60 days, or at all. If we are unable to do so quickly, our operations are likely to experience a disruption, our business, financial condition and results of operations as well as our ability to pay distributions are likely to be adversely affected and the market price of our shares may decline. In addition, the coordination of our internal management and investment activities or our internal administration activities, as applicable, is likely to suffer if we are unable to identify and reach an agreement with a single institution or group of executives having the expertise possessed by the Investment Adviser and its affiliates or the Administrator and its affiliates. Even if we are able to retain comparable management or administration, whether internal or external, the integration of such management or administration and their lack of familiarity with our investment objective may result in additional costs and time delays that may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Changes in the laws or regulations governing our business or the businesses of our portfolio companies and any failure by us or our portfolio companies to comply with these laws or regulations could negatively affect the profitability of our operations or the profitability of our portfolio companies.
We are subject to changing rules and regulations of federal and state governments, as well as the stock exchange on which our common stock is listed. These entities, including the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, the SEC and the NASDAQ Global Select Market, have issued a significant number of new and increasingly complex requirements and regulations over the course of the last several years and continue to develop additional regulations. In particular, changes in the laws or regulations or the interpretations of the laws and regulations that govern BDCs, RICs or non-depository commercial lenders could significantly affect our operations and our cost of doing business. We are subject to federal, state and local laws and regulations and are subject to judicial and administrative decisions that affect our operations, including our loan originations, maximum interest rates, fees and other charges, disclosures to portfolio companies, the terms of secured transactions, collection and foreclosure procedures and other trade practices. If these laws, regulations or decisions change, or if we expand our business into jurisdictions that have adopted more stringent requirements than those in which we currently conduct business, we may have to incur significant expenses in order to comply, or we might have to restrict our operations. In addition, if we do not comply with applicable laws, regulations and decisions, we may lose licenses needed for the conduct of our business and be subject to civil fines and criminal penalties, any of which could have a material adverse effect upon our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Foreign and domestic political risk may adversely affect our business.
We are exposed to political risk to the extent that Prospect Capital Management, on its behalf and subject to its investment guidelines, transacts in securities in the U.S. and foreign markets. The governments in any of these jurisdictions could impose restrictions, regulations or other measures, which may have a material adverse impact on our strategy.
Risks Relating to Our Operation as a Business Development Company
If we do not invest a sufficient portion of our assets in qualifying assets, we could fail to qualify as a BDC or be precluded from investing according to our current business strategy.
As a BDC, we may not acquire any assets other than "qualifying assets" unless, at the time of and after giving effect to such acquisition, at least 70% of our total assets are qualifying assets. We may be precluded from investing in what we believe are attractive investments if such investments are not qualifying assets for purposes of the 1940 Act. If we do not invest a sufficient portion of our assets in qualifying assets, we could be found to be in violation of the 1940 Act provisions applicable to BDCs, which would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Similarly, these rules could prevent us from making follow-on investments in existing portfolio companies (which could result in the dilution of our position) or could require us to dispose of investments at inappropriate times in order to come into compliance with the 1940 Act. Because most of our investments will be in private companies, and therefore will be relatively illiquid, any such dispositions could be made at disadvantageous prices and could result in substantial losses.
If we fail to qualify as a RIC, we will have to pay corporate-level taxes on our income, and our income available for distribution would be reduced.
To maintain our qualification for U.S. federal income tax purposes as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code and obtain RIC tax treatment, we must meet certain source of income, annual distribution and asset diversification requirements.
The source of income requirement is satisfied if we derive at least 90% of our annual gross income from interest, dividends, payments with respect to certain securities loans, gains from the sale or other disposition of securities or options thereon or foreign currencies, or other income derived with respect to our business of investing in such securities or currencies, and net income from interests in "qualified publicly traded partnerships," as defined in the Code.

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The annual distribution requirement for a RIC is satisfied if we distribute at least 90% of our ordinary income and net short-term capital gains in excess of net long-term capital losses, if any, to our stockholders on an annual basis. Because we use debt financing, we are subject to certain asset coverage ratio requirements under the 1940 Act and financial covenants that could, under certain circumstances, restrict us from making distributions necessary to qualify for RIC tax treatment. If we are unable to obtain cash from other sources, we may fail to qualify for RIC tax treatment and, thus, may be subject to corporate-level income tax on all of our taxable income.
To maintain our qualification as a RIC, we must also meet certain asset diversification requirements at the end of each quarter of our taxable year. Failure to meet these tests may result in our having to dispose of certain investments quickly in order to prevent the loss of RIC status. Because most of our investments are in private companies, any such dispositions could be made at disadvantageous prices and may result in substantial losses.
If we fail to qualify as a RIC for any reason or become subject to corporate income tax, the resulting corporate taxes would substantially reduce our net assets, the amount of income available for distribution, and the actual amount of our distributions. Such a failure would have a materially adverse effect on us and our stockholders. For additional information regarding asset coverage ratio and RIC requirements, see "Business – Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations" and "Business – Regulation as a Business Development Company."
We may have difficulty paying our required distributions if we recognize income before or without receiving cash representing such income.
For U.S. federal income tax purposes, we include in income certain amounts that we have not yet received in cash, such as original issue discount or payment-in-kind interest, which represents contractual interest added to the loan balance and due at the end of the loan term. Such amounts could be significant relative to our overall investment activities. We also may be required to include in taxable income certain other amounts that we do not receive in cash. While we focus primarily on investments that will generate a current cash return, our investment portfolio currently includes, and we may continue to invest in, securities that do not pay some or all of their return in periodic current cash distributions.
The income incentive fee payable by us is computed and paid on income that may include interest that has been accrued but not yet received in cash. If a portfolio company defaults on a loan that is structured to provide accrued interest, it is possible that accrued interest previously used in the calculation of the income incentive fee will become uncollectible.
Since in some cases we may recognize taxable income before or without receiving cash representing such income, we may have difficulty distributing at least 90% of our ordinary income and realized net short-term capital gains in excess of realized net long-term capital losses, if any, as required to maintain RIC tax treatment. Accordingly, we may have to sell some of our investments at times we would not consider advantageous, raise additional debt or equity capital or reduce new investment originations to meet these distribution requirements. If we are not able to obtain cash from other sources, we may fail to qualify for RIC treatment and thus become subject to corporate-level income tax. See "Business – Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations" and "Business – Regulation as a Business Development Company."
Regulations governing our operation as a business development company affect our ability to raise, and the way in which we raise, additional capital.
We have incurred indebtedness under our revolving credit facility and through the issuance of the Senior Notes and, in the future, may issue preferred stock or debt securities and/or borrow additional money from banks or other financial institutions, which we refer to collectively as "senior securities," up to the maximum amount permitted by the 1940 Act. Under the provisions of the 1940 Act, we are permitted, as a BDC, to incur indebtedness or issue senior securities only in amounts such that our asset coverage, as defined in the 1940 Act, equals at least 200% after each issuance of senior securities. If the value of our assets declines, we may be unable to satisfy this test, which would prohibit us from paying dividends in cash or other property and could prohibit us from qualifying as a RIC. If we cannot satisfy this test, we may be required to sell a portion of our investments or sell additional shares of common stock at a time when such sales may be disadvantageous in order to repay a portion of our indebtedness or otherwise increase our net assets. In addition, issuance of additional common stock could dilute the percentage ownership of our current stockholders in us.
As a BDC regulated under provisions of the 1940 Act, we are not generally able to issue and sell our common stock at a price below the current net asset value per share without stockholder approval. If our common stock trades at a discount to net asset value, this restriction could adversely affect our ability to raise capital. We may, however, sell our common stock, or warrants, options or rights to acquire our common stock, at a price below the current net asset value of our common stock in certain circumstances, including if (i)(1) the holders of a majority of our shares (or, if less, at least 67% of a quorum consisting of a majority of our shares) and a similar majority of the holders of our shares who are not affiliated persons of us approve the sale of

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our common stock at a price that is less than the current net asset value, and (2) a majority of our Directors who have no financial interest in the transaction and a majority of our independent Directors (a) determine that such sale is in our and our stockholders' best interests and (b) in consultation with any underwriter or underwriters of the offering, make a good faith determination as of a time either immediately prior to the first solicitation by us or on our behalf of firm commitments to purchase such shares, or immediately prior to the issuance of such shares, that the price at which such shares are to be sold is not less than a price which closely approximates the market value of such shares, less any distributing commission or discount or if (ii) a majority of the number of the beneficial holders of our common stock entitled to vote at our annual meeting, without regard to whether a majority of such shares are voted in favor of the proposal, approve the sale of our common stock at a price that is less than the current net asset value per share.
To generate cash for funding new investments, we pledged a substantial portion of our portfolio investments under our revolving credit facility. These assets are not available to secure other sources of funding or for securitization. Our ability to obtain additional secured or unsecured financing on attractive terms in the future is uncertain.
Alternatively, we may securitize our future loans to generate cash for funding new investments. See "Securitization of our assets subjects us to various risks."
Securitization of our assets subjects us to various risks.
We may securitize assets to generate cash for funding new investments. We refer to the term securitize to describe a form of leverage under which a company such as us (sometimes referred to as an "originator" or "sponsor") transfers income producing assets to a single-purpose, bankruptcy-remote subsidiary (also referred to as a "special purpose entity" or "SPE"), which is established solely for the purpose of holding such assets and entering into a structured finance transaction. The SPE then issues notes secured by such assets. The special purpose entity may issue the notes in the capital markets either publicly or privately to a variety of investors, including banks, non-bank financial institutions and other investors. There may be a single class of notes or multiple classes of notes, the most senior of which carries less credit risk and the most junior of which may carry substantially the same credit risk as the equity of the SPE.
An important aspect of most debt securitization transactions is that the sale and/or contribution of assets into the SPE be considered a true sale and/or contribution for accounting purposes and that a reviewing court would not consolidate the SPE with the operations of the originator in the event of the originator's bankruptcy based on equitable principles. Viewed as a whole, a debt securitization seeks to lower risk to the note purchasers by isolating the assets collateralizing the securitization in an SPE that is not subject to the credit and bankruptcy risks of the originator. As a result of this perceived reduction of risk, debt securitization transactions frequently achieve lower overall leverage costs for originators as compared to traditional secured lending transactions.
In accordance with the above description, to securitize loans, we may create a wholly-owned subsidiary and contribute a pool of our assets to such subsidiary. The SPE may be funded with, among other things, whole loans or interests from other pools and such loans may or may not be rated. The SPE would then sell its notes to purchasers who we would expect to be willing to accept a lower interest rate and the absence of any recourse against us to invest in a pool of income producing assets to which none of our creditors would have access. We would retain all or a portion of the equity in the SPE. An inability to successfully securitize portions of our portfolio or otherwise leverage our portfolio through secured and unsecured borrowings could limit our ability to grow our business and fully execute our business strategy, and could decrease our earnings. However, the successful securitization of portions of our portfolio exposes us to a risk of loss for the equity we retain in the SPE and might expose us to greater risk on our remaining portfolio because the assets we retain may tend to be those that are riskier and more likely to generate losses. A successful securitization may also impose financial and operating covenants that restrict our business activities and may include limitations that could hinder our ability to finance additional loans and investments or to make the distributions required to maintain our status as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code. The 1940 Act may also impose restrictions on the structure of any securitizations.
Interests we hold in the SPE, if any, will be subordinated to the other interests issued by the SPE. As such, we will only receive cash distributions on such interests if the SPE has made all cash interest and other required payments on all other interests it has issued. In addition, our subordinated interests will likely be unsecured and rank behind all of the secured creditors, known or unknown, of the SPE, including the holders of the senior interests it has issued. Consequently, to the extent that the value of the SPEs portfolio of assets has been reduced as a result of conditions in the credit markets, or as a result of defaults, the value of the subordinated interests we retain would be reduced. Securitization imposes on us the same risks as borrowing except that our risk in a securitization is limited to the amount of subordinated interests we retain, whereas in a borrowing or debt issuance by us directly we would be at risk for the entire amount of the borrowing or debt issuance.
If the SPE is not consolidated with us, our only interest will be the value of our retained subordinated interest and the income allocated to us, which may be more or less than the cash we receive from the SPE, and none of the SPEs liabilities will be reflected

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as our liabilities. If the assets of the SPE are not consolidated with our assets and liabilities, then our interest in the SPE may be deemed not to be a qualifying asset for purposes of determining whether 70% of our assets are qualifying assets and the leverage incurred by such SPE may or may not be treated as borrowings by us for purposes of the requirement that we not issue senior securities in an amount in excess of our net assets.
We may also engage in transactions utilizing SPEs and securitization techniques where the assets sold or contributed to the SPE remain on our balance sheet for accounting purposes. If, for example, we sell the assets to the SPE with recourse or provide a guarantee or other credit support to the SPE, its assets will remain on our balance sheet. Consolidation would also generally result if we, in consultation with the SEC, determine that consolidation would result in a more accurate reflection of our assets, liabilities and results of operations. In these structures, the risks will be essentially the same as in other securitization transactions but the assets will remain our assets for purposes of the limitations described above on investing in assets that are not qualifying assets and the leverage incurred by the SPE will be treated as borrowings incurred by us for purposes of our limitation on the issuance of senior securities.
The Investment Adviser may have conflicts of interest with respect to potential securitizations in as much as securitizations that are not consolidated may reduce our assets for purposes of determining its investment advisory fee although in some circumstances the Investment Adviser may be paid certain fees for managing the assets of the SPE so as to reduce or eliminate any potential bias against securitizations.
Our ability to invest in public companies may be limited in certain circumstances.
As a BDC, we must not acquire any assets other than "qualifying assets" specified in the 1940 Act unless, at the time the acquisition is made, at least 70% of our total assets are qualifying assets (with certain limited exceptions). Subject to certain exceptions for follow-on investments and distressed companies, an investment in an issuer that has outstanding securities listed on a national securities exchange may be treated as qualifying assets only if such issuer has a market capitalization that is less than $250 million at the time of such investment.
Risks Relating to Our Investments
We may not realize gains or income from our investments.
We seek to generate both current income and capital appreciation. However, the securities we invest in may not appreciate and, in fact, may decline in value, and the issuers of debt securities we invest in may default on interest and/or principal payments. Accordingly, we may not be able to realize gains from our investments, and any gains that we do realize may not be sufficient to offset any losses we experience. See "Business – Our Investment Objective and Policies."
Most of our portfolio investments are recorded at fair value as determined in good faith under the direction of our Board of Directors and, as a result, there is uncertainty as to the value of our portfolio investments.
A large percentage of our portfolio investments consist of securities of privately held companies. Hence, market quotations are generally not readily available for determining the fair values of such investments. The determination of fair value, and thus the amount of unrealized losses we may incur in any year, is to a degree subjective, and the Investment Adviser has a conflict of interest in making the determination. We value these securities quarterly at fair value as determined in good faith by our Board of Directors based on input from the Investment Adviser, our Administrator, a third party independent valuation firm and our Audit Committee. Our Board of Directors utilizes the services of an independent valuation firm to aid it in determining the fair value of any securities. The types of factors that may be considered in determining the fair values of our investments include the nature and realizable value of any collateral, the portfolio company's ability to make payments and its earnings, the markets in which the portfolio company does business, comparison to publicly traded companies, discounted cash flow, current market interest rates and other relevant factors. Because such valuations, and particularly valuations of private securities and private companies, are inherently uncertain, the valuations may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time due to changes in current market conditions. The determinations of fair value by our Board of Directors may differ materially from the values that would have been used if an active market and market quotations existed for these investments. Our net asset value could be adversely affected if the determinations regarding the fair value of our investments were materially higher than the values that we ultimately realize upon the disposal of such securities.
In addition, decreases in the market values or fair values of our investments are recorded as unrealized depreciation. Declines in prices and liquidity in the corporate debt markets experienced during a financial crisis will result in significant net unrealized depreciation in our portfolio. The effect of all of these factors on our portfolio will reduce our NAV by increasing net unrealized depreciation in our portfolio. Depending on market conditions, we could incur substantial realized losses which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations. We have no policy regarding holding a

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minimum level of liquid assets. As such, a high percentage of our portfolio generally is not liquid at any given point in time. See "The lack of liquidity may adversely affect our business."
Price declines and illiquidity in the corporate debt markets have adversely affected, and may in the future adversely affect, the fair value of our portfolio investments, reducing our net asset value through increased net unrealized depreciation.
As a BDC, we are required to carry our investments at market value or, if no market value is ascertainable, at fair value as determined in good faith by or under the direction of our Board of Directors. As part of the valuation process, the types of factors that we may take into account in determining the fair value of our investments include, as relevant and among other factors: available current market data, including relevant and applicable market trading and transaction comparables, applicable market yields and multiples, security covenants, call protection provisions, information rights, the nature and realizable value of any collateral, the portfolio company's ability to make payments, its earnings and discounted cash flows, the markets in which the portfolio company does business, comparisons of financial ratios of peer companies that are public, merger and acquisition comparables, our principal market (as the reporting entity) and enterprise values. Decreases in the market values or fair values of our investments are recorded as unrealized depreciation. The effect of all of these factors on our portfolio can reduce our net asset value by increasing net unrealized depreciation in our portfolio. Depending on market conditions, we could incur substantial realized losses and may suffer additional unrealized losses in future periods, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our investments in prospective portfolio companies may be risky and we could lose all or part of our investment.
Some of our portfolio companies have relatively short or no operating histories. These companies are and will be subject to all of the business risk and uncertainties associated with any new business enterprise, including the risk that these companies may not reach their investment objective and the value of our investment in them may decline substantially or fall to zero. In addition, investment in the middle market companies that we are targeting involves a number of other significant risks, including:
These companies may have limited financial resources and may be unable to meet their obligations under their securities that we hold, which may be accompanied by a deterioration in the value of their securities or of any collateral with respect to any securities and a reduction in the likelihood of our realizing on any guarantees we may have obtained in connection with our investment.
They may have shorter operating histories, narrower product lines and smaller market shares than larger businesses, which tend to render them more vulnerable to competitors’ actions and market conditions, as well as general economic downturns.
Because many of these companies are privately held companies, public information is generally not available about these companies. As a result, we will depend on the ability of the Investment Adviser to obtain adequate information to evaluate these companies in making investment decisions. If the Investment Adviser is unable to uncover all material information about these companies, it may not make a fully informed investment decision, and we may lose money on our investments.
They are more likely to depend on the management talents and efforts of a small group of persons; therefore, the death, disability, resignation or termination of one or more of these persons could have a materially adverse impact on our portfolio company and, in turn, on us.
They may have less predictable operating results, may from time to time be parties to litigation, may be engaged in changing businesses with products subject to a risk of obsolescence and may require substantial additional capital to support their operations, finance expansion or maintain their competitive position.
They may have difficulty accessing the capital markets to meet future capital needs.
Changes in laws and regulations, as well as their interpretations, may adversely affect their business, financial structure or prospects.
Increased taxes, regulatory expense or the costs of changes to the way they conduct business due to the effects of climate change may adversely affect their business, financial structure or prospects.
We acquire majority interests in operating companies engaged in a variety of industries. When we acquire these companies we generally seek to apply financial leverage to them in the form of debt. In most cases all or a portion of this debt is held by us, with the obligor being either the operating company itself, a holding company through which we own our majority interest or both. The level of debt leverage utilized by these companies makes them susceptible to the risks identified above.

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In addition, our executive officers, directors and the Investment Adviser could, in the ordinary course of business, be named as defendants in litigation arising from proposed investments or from our investments in the portfolio companies.
The lack of liquidity in our investments may adversely affect our business.
We make investments in private companies. A portion of these investments may be subject to legal and other restrictions on resale, transfer, pledge or other disposition or will otherwise be less liquid than publicly traded securities. The illiquidity of our investments may make it difficult for us to sell such investments if the need arises. In addition, if we are required to liquidate all or a portion of our portfolio quickly, we may realize significantly less than the value at which we have previously recorded our investments. In addition, we face other restrictions on our ability to liquidate an investment in a business entity to the extent that we or the Investment Adviser has or could be deemed to have material non-public information regarding such business entity.
Economic recessions or downturns could impair our portfolio companies and harm our operating results.
Many of our portfolio companies may be susceptible to economic slowdowns or recessions and may be unable to repay our loans or meet other obligations during these periods. Therefore, our non-performing assets are likely to increase, and the value of our portfolio is likely to decrease, during these periods. Adverse economic conditions also may decrease the value of collateral securing some of our loans and the value of our equity investments. Economic slowdowns or recessions could lead to financial losses in our portfolio and a decrease in revenues, net income and assets. Unfavorable economic conditions also could increase our funding costs, limit our access to the capital markets or result in a decision by lenders not to extend credit to us. These events could prevent us from increasing investments and harm our operating results.
A portfolio company's failure to satisfy financial or operating covenants imposed by us or other lenders could lead to defaults and, potentially, termination of its loans and foreclosure on its secured assets, which could trigger cross-defaults under other agreements and jeopardize a portfolio company's ability to meet its obligations under the debt or equity securities that we hold. We may incur expenses to the extent necessary to seek recovery upon default or to negotiate new terms, which may include the waiver of certain financial covenants, with a defaulting portfolio company. In addition, if one of our portfolio companies were to go bankrupt, even though we may have structured our interest as senior debt or preferred equity, depending on the facts and circumstances, including the extent to which we actually provided managerial assistance to that portfolio company, a bankruptcy court might re-characterize our debt or equity holding and subordinate all or a portion of our claim to those of other creditors.
Investments in equity securities, many of which are illiquid with no readily available market, involve a substantial degree of risk.
We may purchase common and other equity securities. Although common stock has historically generated higher average total returns than fixed income securities over the long-term, common stock has significantly more volatility in those returns and may significantly underperform relative to fixed income securities. The equity securities we acquire may fail to appreciate and may decline in value or become worthless and our ability to recover our investment will depend on our portfolio company's success. Investments in equity securities involve a number of significant risks, including:
Any equity investment we make in a portfolio company could be subject to further dilution as a result of the issuance of additional equity interests and to serious risks as a junior security that will be subordinate to all indebtedness (including trade creditors) or senior securities in the event that the issuer is unable to meet its obligations or becomes subject to a bankruptcy process.
To the extent that the portfolio company requires additional capital and is unable to obtain it, we may not recover our investment.
In some cases, equity securities in which we invest will not pay current dividends, and our ability to realize a return on our investment, as well as to recover our investment, will be dependent on the success of the portfolio company. Even if the portfolio company is successful, our ability to realize the value of our investment may be dependent on the occurrence of a liquidity event, such as a public offering or the sale of the portfolio company. It is likely to take a significant amount of time before a liquidity event occurs or we can otherwise sell our investment. In addition, the equity securities we receive or invest in may be subject to restrictions on resale during periods in which it could be advantageous to sell them.

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There are special risks associated with investing in preferred securities, including:
Preferred securities may include provisions that permit the issuer, at its discretion, to defer distributions for a stated period without any adverse consequences to the issuer. If we own a preferred security that is deferring its distributions, we may be required to report income for tax purposes before we receive such distributions.
Preferred securities are subordinated to debt in terms of priority to income and liquidation payments, and therefore will be subject to greater credit risk than debt.
Preferred securities may be substantially less liquid than many other securities, such as common stock or U.S. government securities.
Generally, preferred security holders have no voting rights with respect to the issuing company, subject to limited exceptions.
Additionally, when we invest in first lien senior secured loans (including unitranche loans), second lien senior secured loans or unsecured debt, we may acquire warrants or other equity securities as well. Our goal is ultimately to dispose of such equity interests and realize gains upon our disposition of such interests. However, the equity interests we receive may not appreciate in value and, in fact, may decline in value. Accordingly, we may not be able to realize gains from our equity interests and any gains that we do realize on the disposition of any equity interests may not be sufficient to offset any other losses we experience.
We may invest, to the extent permitted by law, in the equity securities of investment funds that are operating pursuant to certain exceptions to the 1940 Act and in advisers to similar investment funds and, to the extent we so invest, will bear our ratable share of any such company's expenses, including management and performance fees. We will also remain obligated to pay management and incentive fees to Prospect Capital Management with respect to the assets invested in the securities and instruments of such companies. With respect to each of these investments, each of our common stockholders will bear his or her share of the management and incentive fee of Prospect Capital Management as well as indirectly bearing the management and performance fees and other expenses of any such investment funds or advisers.
There may be circumstances where our debt investments could be subordinated to claims of other creditors or we could be subject to lender liability claims.
If one of our portfolio companies were to go bankrupt, even though we may have structured our interest as senior debt, depending on the facts and circumstances, a bankruptcy court might recharacterize our debt holding as an equity investment and subordinate all or a portion of our claim to that of other creditors. In addition, lenders can be subject to lender liability claims for actions taken by them where they become too involved in the borrower's business or exercise control over the borrower. For example, we could become subject to a lender's liability claim, if, among other things, we actually render significant managerial assistance.
Our portfolio companies may incur debt or issue equity securities that rank equally with, or senior to, our investments in such companies.
Our portfolio companies may have, or may be permitted to incur, other debt or issue other equity securities that rank equally with or senior to our investments. By their terms, such instruments may provide that the holders are entitled to receive payment of dividends, interest or principal on or before the dates on which we are entitled to receive payments in respect of our investments. These debt instruments would usually prohibit the portfolio companies from paying interest on or repaying our investments in the event and during the continuance of a default under such debt. Also, in the event of insolvency, liquidation, dissolution, reorganization or bankruptcy of a portfolio company, holders of securities ranking senior to our investment in that portfolio company typically are entitled to receive payment in full before we receive any distribution in respect of our investment. After repaying such holders, the portfolio company may not have any remaining assets to use for repaying its obligation to us. In the case of securities ranking equally with our investments, we would have to share on an equal basis any distributions with other security holders in the event of an insolvency, liquidation, dissolution, reorganization or bankruptcy of the relevant portfolio company.
The rights we may have with respect to the collateral securing any junior priority loans we make to our portfolio companies may also be limited pursuant to the terms of one or more intercreditor agreements (including agreements governing ‘‘first out’’ and ‘‘last out’’ structures) that we enter into with the holders of senior debt. Under such an intercreditor agreement, at any time that senior obligations are outstanding, we may forfeit certain rights with respect to the collateral to the holders of the senior obligations. These rights may include the right to commence enforcement proceedings against the collateral, the right to control the conduct of such enforcement proceedings, the right to approve amendments to collateral documents, the right to release liens on the collateral and the right to waive past defaults under collateral documents. We may not have the ability to control or direct such actions, even if as a result our rights as junior lenders are adversely affected.

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This risk is characteristic of many of the majority-owned operating companies in our portfolio in that any debt to us from a holding company and the holding company's substantial equity investments in the related operating company are subordinated to any creditors of the operating company.
When we are a debt or minority equity investor in a portfolio company, we are often not in a position to exert influence on the entity, and other debt holders, other equity holders and portfolio company management may make decisions that could decrease the value of our portfolio holdings.
When we make debt or minority equity investments, we are subject to the risk that a portfolio company may make business decisions with which we disagree and the other equity holders and management of such company may take risks or otherwise act in ways that do not serve our interests. As a result, a portfolio company may make decisions that could decrease the value of our investment. In addition, when we hold a subordinate debt position, other more senior debt holders may make decisions that could decrease the value of our investment.
Our portfolio companies may be highly leveraged.
Some of our portfolio companies may be highly leveraged, which may have adverse consequences to these companies and to us as an investor. These companies may be subject to restrictive financial and operating covenants and the leverage may impair these companies' ability to finance their future operations and capital needs. As a result, these companies' flexibility to respond to changing business and economic conditions and to take advantage of business opportunities may be limited. Further, a leveraged company's income and net assets will tend to increase or decrease at a greater rate than if borrowed money were not used.
Our portfolio contains a limited number of portfolio companies, which subjects us to a greater risk of significant loss if any of these companies defaults on its obligations under any of its debt securities.
A consequence of the limited number of investments in our portfolio is that the aggregate returns we realize may be significantly adversely affected if one or more of our significant portfolio company investments perform poorly or if we need to write down the value of any one significant investment. Beyond our income tax diversification requirements, we do not have fixed guidelines for diversification, and our portfolio could contain relatively few portfolio companies.
Our failure to make follow-on investments in our existing portfolio companies could impair the value of our portfolio.
Following an initial investment in a portfolio company, we may make additional investments in that portfolio company as "follow-on" investments, in order to: (1) increase or maintain in whole or in part our equity ownership percentage; (2) exercise warrants, options or convertible securities that were acquired in the original or subsequent financing or (3) attempt to preserve or enhance the value of our investment.
We may elect not to make follow-on investments, may be constrained in our ability to employ available funds, or otherwise may lack sufficient funds to make those investments. We have the discretion to make any follow-on investments, subject to the availability of capital resources. The failure to make follow-on investments may, in some circumstances, jeopardize the continued viability of a portfolio company and our initial investment, or may result in a missed opportunity for us to increase our participation in a successful operation. Even if we have sufficient capital to make a desired follow-on investment, we may elect not to make a follow-on investment because we may not want to increase our concentration of risk, because we prefer other opportunities, or because we are inhibited by compliance with BDC requirements or the desire to maintain our tax status.
We may be unable to invest the net proceeds raised from offerings and repayments from investments on acceptable terms, which would harm our financial condition and operating results.
Until we identify new investment opportunities, we intend to either invest the net proceeds of future offerings and repayments from investments in interest-bearing deposits or other short-term instruments or use the net proceeds from such offerings to reduce then-outstanding obligations under our credit facility. We cannot assure you that we will be able to find enough appropriate investments that meet our investment criteria or that any investment we complete using the proceeds from an offering will produce a sufficient return.
We may have limited access to information about privately-held companies in which we invest.
We invest primarily in privately-held companies. Generally, little public information exists about these companies, and we are required to rely on the ability of the Investment Adviser's investment professionals to obtain adequate information to evaluate the potential returns from investing in these companies. These companies and their financial information are not subject to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and other rules that govern public companies. If we are unable to uncover all material information about these companies, we may not make a fully informed investment decision, and we may lose money on our investment.

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We may not be able to fully realize the value of the collateral securing our debt investments.
Although a substantial amount of our debt investments are protected by holding security interests in the assets of the portfolio companies, we may not be able to fully realize the value of the collateral securing our investments due to one or more of the following factors:
Our debt investments may be in the form of unsecured loans, therefore our liens on the collateral, if any, are subordinated to those of the senior secured debt of the portfolio companies, if any. As a result, we may not be able to control remedies with respect to the collateral.
The collateral may not be valuable enough to satisfy all of the obligations under our secured loan, particularly after giving effect to the repayment of secured debt of the portfolio company that ranks senior to our loan.
Bankruptcy laws may limit our ability to realize value from the collateral and may delay the realization process.
Our rights in the collateral may be adversely affected by the failure to perfect security interests in the collateral.
The need to obtain regulatory and contractual consents could impair or impede how effectively the collateral would be liquidated and could affect the value received.
Some or all of the collateral may be illiquid and may have no readily ascertainable market value. The liquidity and value of the collateral could be impaired as a result of changing economic conditions, competition, and other factors, including the availability of suitable buyers.
Our investments in foreign securities may involve significant risks in addition to the risks inherent in U.S. investments.
Our investment strategy contemplates potential investments in securities of foreign companies, including those located in emerging market countries. Investing in foreign companies may expose us to additional risks not typically associated with investing in U.S. companies. These risks include changes in exchange control regulations, political and social instability, expropriation, imposition of foreign taxes, less liquid markets and less available information than is generally the case in the United States, higher transaction costs, less government supervision of exchanges, brokers and issuers, less developed bankruptcy laws, difficulty in enforcing contractual obligations, lack of uniform accounting and auditing standards and greater price volatility. Such risks are more pronounced in emerging market countries.
Although currently substantially all of our investments are, and we expect that most of our investments will be, U.S. dollar-denominated, investments that are denominated in a foreign currency will be subject to the risk that the value of a particular currency will change in relation to one or more other currencies. Among the factors that may affect currency values are trade balances, the level of short-term interest rates, differences in relative values of similar assets in different currencies, long-term opportunities for investment and capital appreciation, and political developments.
We may expose ourselves to risks if we engage in hedging transactions.
We may employ hedging techniques to minimize certain investment risks, such as fluctuations in interest and currency exchange rates, but we can offer no assurance that such strategies will be effective. If we engage in hedging transactions, we may expose ourselves to risks associated with such transactions. We may utilize instruments such as forward contracts, currency options and interest rate swaps, caps, collars and floors to seek to hedge against fluctuations in the relative values of our portfolio positions from changes in currency exchange rates and market interest rates. Hedging against a decline in the values of our portfolio positions does not eliminate the possibility of fluctuations in the values of such positions or prevent losses if the values of such positions decline. However, such hedging can establish other positions designed to gain from those same developments, thereby offsetting the decline in the value of such portfolio positions. Such hedging transactions may also limit the opportunity for gain if the values of the portfolio positions should increase. Moreover, it may not be possible to hedge against an exchange rate or interest rate fluctuation that is so generally anticipated that we are not able to enter into a hedging transaction at an acceptable price. Furthermore, our ability to engage in hedging transactions may also be adversely affected by rules adopted by the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission.
The success of our hedging transactions depends on our ability to correctly predict movements, currencies and interest rates. Therefore, while we may enter into such transactions to seek to reduce currency exchange rate and interest rate risks, unanticipated changes in currency exchange rates or interest rates may result in poorer overall investment performance than if we had not engaged in any such hedging transactions. The degree of correlation between price movements of the instruments used in a hedging strategy and price movements in the portfolio positions being hedged may vary. Moreover, for a variety of reasons, we may not seek to establish a perfect correlation between such hedging instruments and the portfolio holdings being hedged. Any such imperfect

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correlation may prevent us from achieving the intended hedge and expose us to risk of loss. In addition, it may not be possible to hedge fully or perfectly against currency fluctuations affecting the value of securities denominated in non-U.S. currencies. We have no current intention of engaging in any of the hedging transaction described above, although it reserves the right to do so in the future.
Our Board of Directors may change our operating policies and strategies without prior notice or stockholder approval, the effects of which may be adverse to us and could impair the value of our stockholders' investment.
Our Board of Directors has the authority to modify or waive our current operating policies and our strategies without prior notice and without stockholder approval. We cannot predict the effect any changes to our current operating policies and strategies would have on our business, financial condition, and value of our common stock. However, the effects might be adverse, which could negatively impact our ability to pay dividends and cause stockholders to lose all or part of their investment.
Our investments in CLOs may be riskier and less transparent to us and our stockholders than direct investments in the underlying companies.
We invest in CLOs. Generally, there may be less information available to us regarding the underlying debt investments held by CLOs than if we had invested directly in the debt of the underlying companies. As a result, our stockholders will not know the details of the underlying securities of the CLOs in which we will invest. Our CLO investments are subject to the risk of leverage associated with the debt issued by such CLOs and the repayment priority of senior debt holders in such CLOs. Our investments in portfolio companies may be risky, and we could lose all or part of our investment.
CLOs typically will have no significant assets other than their underlying senior secured loans; payments on CLO investments are and will be payable solely from the cash flows from such senior secured loans.
CLOs typically will have no significant assets other than their underlying senior secured loans. Accordingly, payments on CLO investments are and will be payable solely from the cash flows from such senior secured loans, net of all management fees and other expenses. Payments to us as a holder of CLO junior securities are and will be made only after payments due on the senior secured notes, and, where appropriate, the junior secured notes, have been made in full. This means that relatively small numbers of defaults of senior secured loans may adversely impact our returns.
Our CLO investments are exposed to leveraged credit risk.
Generally, we are in a subordinated position with respect to realized losses on the senior secured loans underlying our investments in CLOs. The leveraged nature of CLOs, in particular, magnifies the adverse impact of senior secured loan defaults. CLO investments represent a leveraged investment with respect to the underlying senior secured loans. Therefore, changes in the market value of the CLO investments could be greater than the change in the market value of the underlying senior secured loans, which are subject to credit, liquidity and interest rate risk.
There is the potential for interruption and deferral of cash flow from CLO investments.
If certain minimum collateral value ratios and/or interest coverage ratios are not met by a CLO, primarily due to senior secured loan defaults, then cash flow that otherwise would have been available to pay distributions to us on our CLO investments may instead be used to redeem any senior notes or to purchase additional senior secured loans, until the ratios again exceed the minimum required levels or any senior notes are repaid in full. This could result in an elimination, reduction or deferral in the distribution and/or principal paid to the holders of the CLO investments, which would adversely impact our returns.
Investments in foreign securities may involve significant risks in addition to the risks inherent in U.S. investments.
Our CLO investment strategy allows investments in foreign CLOs. Investing in foreign entities may expose us to additional risks not typically associated with investing in U.S. issuers. These risks include changes in exchange control regulations, political and social instability, expropriation, imposition of foreign taxes, less liquid markets and less available information than is generally the case in the United States, higher transaction costs, less government supervision of exchanges, brokers and issuers, less developed bankruptcy laws, difficulty in enforcing contractual obligations, lack of uniform accounting and auditing standards and greater price volatility. Further, we, and the CLOs in which we invest, may have difficulty enforcing creditor's rights in foreign jurisdictions. In addition, the underlying companies of the CLOs in which we invest may be foreign, which may create greater exposure for us to foreign economic developments.

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The payment of underlying portfolio manager fees and other charges on CLO investments could adversely impact our returns.
We may invest in CLO investments where the underlying portfolio securities may be subject to management, administration and incentive or performance fees, in addition to those payable by us. Payment of such additional fees could adversely impact the returns we achieve.
The inability of a CLO collateral manager to reinvest the proceeds of the prepayment of senior secured loans may adversely affect us.
There can be no assurance that for any CLO investment, in the event that any of the senior secured loans of a CLO underlying such investment are prepaid, the CLO collateral manager will be able to reinvest such proceeds in new senior secured loans with equivalent investment returns. If the CLO collateral manager cannot reinvest in new senior secured loans with equivalent investment returns, the interest proceeds available to pay interest on the rated liabilities and investments may be adversely affected.
Our CLO investments are subject to prepayments and calls, increasing re-investment risk.
Our CLO investments and/or the underlying senior secured loans may prepay more quickly than expected, which could have an adverse impact on our value. Prepayment rates are influenced by changes in interest rates and a variety of economic, geographic and other factors beyond our control and consequently cannot be predicted with certainty. In addition, for a CLO collateral manager there is often a strong incentive to refinance well performing portfolios once the senior tranches amortize. The yield to maturity of the investments will depend on the amount and timing of payments of principal on the loans and the price paid for the investments. Such yield may be adversely affected by a higher or lower than anticipated rate of prepayments of the debt.
Furthermore, our CLO investments generally do not contain optional call provisions, other than a call at the option of the holders of the equity tranches for the senior notes and the junior secured notes to be paid in full after the expiration of an initial period in the deal (referred to as the "non-call period").
The exercise of the call option is by the relevant percentage (usually a majority) of the holders of the equity tranches and, therefore, where we do not hold the relevant percentage we will not be able to control the timing of the exercise of the call option. The equity tranches also generally have a call at any time based on certain tax event triggers. In any event, the call can only be exercised by the holders of equity tranches if they can demonstrate (in accordance with the detailed provisions in the transaction) that the senior notes and junior secured notes will be paid in full if the call is exercised.
Early prepayments and/or the exercise of a call option otherwise than at our request may also give rise to increased re-investment risk with respect to certain investments, as we may realize excess cash earlier than expected. If we are unable to reinvest such cash in a new investment with an expected rate of return at least equal to that of the investment repaid, this may reduce our net income and, consequently, could have an adverse impact on our ability to pay dividends.
We have limited control of the administration and amendment of senior secured loans owned by the CLOs in which we invest.
We are not be able to directly enforce any rights and remedies in the event of a default of a senior secured loan held by a CLO vehicle. In addition, the terms and conditions of the senior secured loans underlying our CLO investments may be amended, modified or waived only by the agreement of the underlying lenders. Generally, any such agreement must include a majority or a super majority (measured by outstanding loans or commitments) or, in certain circumstances, a unanimous vote of the lenders. Consequently, the terms and conditions of the payment obligations arising from senior secured loans could be modified, amended or waived in a manner contrary to our preferences.
We have limited control of the administration and amendment of any CLO in which we invest.
The terms and conditions of target securities may be amended, modified or waived only by the agreement of the underlying security holders. Generally, any such agreement must include a majority or a super majority (measured by outstanding amounts) or, in certain circumstances, a unanimous vote of the security holders. Consequently, the terms and conditions of the payment obligation arising from the CLOs in which we invest be modified, amended or waived in a manner contrary to our preferences.
Senior secured loans of CLOs may be sold and replaced resulting in a loss to us.
The senior secured loans underlying our CLO investments may be sold and replacement collateral purchased within the parameters set out in the relevant CLO indenture between the CLO and the CLO trustee and those parameters may typically only be amended, modified or waived by the agreement of a majority of the holders of the senior notes and/or the junior secured notes and/or the equity tranche once the CLO has been established. If these transactions result in a net loss, the magnitude of the loss from the perspective of the equity tranche would be increased by the leveraged nature of the investment.

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Our financial results may be affected adversely if one or more of our significant equity or junior debt investments in a CLO vehicle defaults on its payment obligations or fails to perform as we expect.
We expect that a majority of our portfolio will consist of equity and junior debt investments in CLOs, which involve a number of significant risks. CLOs are typically highly levered up to approximately 10 times, and therefore the junior debt and equity tranches that we will invest in are subject to a higher risk of total loss. In particular, investors in CLOs indirectly bear risks of the underlying debt investments held by such CLOs. We will generally have the right to receive payments only from the CLOs, and will generally not have direct rights against the underlying borrowers or the entities that sponsored the CLOs. Although it is difficult to predict whether the prices of indices and securities underlying CLOs will rise or fall, these prices, and, therefore, the prices of the CLOs will be influenced by the same types of political and economic events that affect issuers of securities and capital markets generally.
The investments we make in CLOs are thinly traded or have only a limited trading market. CLO investments are typically privately offered and sold, in the primary and secondary markets. As a result, investments in CLOs may be characterized as illiquid securities. In addition to the general risks associated with investing in debt securities, CLOs carry additional risks, including, but not limited to: (i) the possibility that distributions from the underlying senior secured loans will not be adequate to make interest or other payments; (ii) the quality of the underlying senior secured loans may decline in value or default; and (iii) the complex structure of the security may not be fully understood at the time of investment and may produce disputes with the CLO or unexpected investment results. Further, our investments in equity and junior debt tranches of CLOs are subordinate to the senior debt tranches thereof.
Investments in structured vehicles, including equity and junior debt instruments issued by CLOs, involve risks, including credit risk and market risk. Changes in interest rates and credit quality may cause significant price fluctuations. Additionally, changes in the underlying senior secured loans held by a CLO may cause payments on the instruments we hold to be reduced, either temporarily or permanently. Structured investments, particularly the subordinated interests in which we invest, are less liquid than many other types of securities and may be more volatile than the senior secured loans underlying the CLOs in which we invest.
Non-investment grade debt involves a greater risk of default and higher price volatility than investment grade debt.
The senior secured loans underlying our CLO investments typically are BB or B rated (non-investment grade) and in limited circumstances, unrated, senior secured loans. Non-investment grade securities are predominantly speculative with respect to the issuer's capacity to pay interest and repay principal when due and therefore involve a greater risk of default and higher price volatility than investment grade debt.
We will have no influence on management of underlying investments managed by non-affiliated third party CLO collateral managers.
We are not responsible for and have no influence over the asset management of the portfolios underlying the CLO investments we hold as those portfolios are managed by non-affiliated third party CLO collateral managers. Similarly, we are not responsible for and have no influence over the day-to-day management, administration or any other aspect of the issuers of the individual securities. As a result, the values of the portfolios underlying our CLO investments could decrease as a result of decisions made by third party CLO collateral managers.
The Volcker Rule may impact how we operate our business.
Section 13 of the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended, often referred to as the "Volcker Rule," is expected to impose significant restrictions on banking entities' ability to sponsor or invest in hedge funds, private equity funds or commodity pools, collectively referred to as covered funds. Certain CLOs will be considered covered funds under the Volcker Rule and banking entities' investments in such CLOs may be considered ownership interests that are prohibited. The rules are highly complex, and many aspects of the implementation of the Volcker Rule remain unclear. We are in the process of assessing the impact of the Volcker Rule on our investments, CLOs and on our industry. The Volcker Rule may have a material adverse effect on our ability to invest in bank-sponsored CLOs in the future and therefore may adversely affect our share price.

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Risks affecting investments in real estate.
We make investments in commercial and multi-family residential real estate through our three wholly-owned real estate investment trusts ("REITs"), American Property REIT Corp., National Property REIT Corp. and United Property REIT Corp. (collectively, "our REITs"). A number of factors may prevent each of our REIT's properties and assets from generating sufficient net cash flow or may adversely affect their value, or both, resulting in less cash available for distribution, or a loss, to us. These factors include:
national economic conditions;
regional and local economic conditions (which may be adversely impacted by plant closings, business layoffs, industry slow-downs, weather conditions, natural disasters, and other factors);
local real estate conditions (such as over-supply of or insufficient demand for office space);
changing demographics;
perceptions by prospective tenants of the convenience, services, safety, and attractiveness of a property;
the ability of property managers to provide capable management and adequate maintenance;
the quality of a property's construction and design;
increases in costs of maintenance, insurance, and operations (including energy costs and real estate taxes);
changes in applicable laws or regulations (including tax laws, zoning laws, or building codes);
potential environmental and other legal liabilities;
the level of financing used by our REITs in respect of their properties, increases in interest rate levels on such financings and the risk that one of our REITs will default on such financings, each of which increases the risk of loss to us;
the availability and cost of refinancing;
the ability to find suitable tenants for a property and to replace any departing tenants with new tenants;
potential instability, default or bankruptcy of tenants in the properties owned by our REITs;
potential limited number of prospective buyers interested in purchasing a property that one of our REITs wishes to sell; and
the relative illiquidity of real estate investments in general, which may make it difficult to sell a property at an attractive price or within a reasonable time frame.
Risks Relating to Our Securities
Our credit ratings may not reflect all risks of an investment in our debt securities.
Our credit ratings are an assessment by third parties of our ability to pay our obligations. Consequently, real or anticipated changes in our credit ratings will generally affect the market value of our debt securities. Our credit ratings, however, may not reflect the potential impact of risks related to market conditions generally or other factors discussed above on the market value of or trading market for the publicly issued debt securities.
Senior securities, including debt, expose us to additional risks, including the typical risks associated with leverage and could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We currently use our revolving credit facility to leverage our portfolio and we expect in the future to borrow from and issue senior debt securities to banks and other lenders and may securitize certain of our portfolio investments. We also have the Senior Notes outstanding, which are a form of leverage and are senior in payment rights to our common stock.
With certain limited exceptions, as a BDC, we are only allowed to borrow amounts or otherwise issue senior securities such that our asset coverage, as defined in the 1940 Act, is at least 200% after such borrowing or other issuance. The amount of leverage that we employ will depend on the Investment Adviser's and our Board of Directors' assessment of market conditions and other

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factors at the time of any proposed borrowing. There is no assurance that a leveraging strategy will be successful. Leverage involves risks and special considerations for stockholders, any of which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations, including the following:
A likelihood of greater volatility in the net asset value and market price of our common stock;
Diminished operating flexibility as a result of asset coverage or investment portfolio composition requirements required by lenders or investors that are more stringent than those imposed by the 1940 Act;
The possibility that investments will have to be liquidated at less than full value or at inopportune times to comply with debt covenants or to pay interest or dividends on the leverage;
Increased operating expenses due to the cost of leverage, including issuance and servicing costs;
Convertible or exchangeable securities, such as the Senior Convertible Notes outstanding or those issued in the future may have rights, preferences and privileges more favorable than those of our common stock;
Subordination to lenders' superior claims on our assets as a result of which lenders will be able to receive proceeds available in the case of our liquidation before any proceeds will be distributed to our stockholders;
Making it more difficult for us to meet our payment and other obligations under the Senior Notes and our other outstanding debt;
The occurrence of an event of default if we fail to comply with the financial and/or other restrictive covenants contained in our debt agreements, including the credit agreement and each indenture governing the Senior Notes, which event of default could result in all or some of our debt becoming immediately due and payable;
Reduced availability of our cash flow to fund investments, acquisitions and other general corporate purposes, and limiting our ability to obtain additional financing for these purposes;
The risk of increased sensitivity to interest rate increases on our indebtedness with variable interest rates, including borrowings under our amended senior credit facility; and
Reduced flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, and increasing our vulnerability to, changes in our business, the industry in which we operate and the general economy.
For example, the amount we may borrow under our revolving credit facility is determined, in part, by the fair value of our investments. If the fair value of our investments declines, we may be forced to sell investments at a loss to maintain compliance with our borrowing limits. Other debt facilities we may enter into in the future may contain similar provisions. Any such forced sales would reduce our net asset value and also make it difficult for the net asset value to recover. The Investment Adviser and our Board of Directors in their best judgment nevertheless may determine to use leverage if they expect that the benefits to our stockholders of maintaining the leveraged position will outweigh the risks.
In addition, our ability to meet our payment and other obligations of the Senior Notes and our credit facility depends on our ability to generate significant cash flow in the future. This, to some extent, is subject to general economic, financial, competitive, legislative and regulatory factors as well as other factors that are beyond our control. We cannot assure you that our business will generate cash flow from operations, or that future borrowings will be available to us under our existing credit facility or otherwise, in an amount sufficient to enable us to meet our payment obligations under the Senior Notes and our other debt and to fund other liquidity needs. If we are not able to generate sufficient cash flow to service our debt obligations, we may need to refinance or restructure our debt, including the Senior Notes, sell assets, reduce or delay capital investments, or seek to raise additional capital. If we are unable to implement one or more of these alternatives, we may not be able to meet our payment obligations under the Senior Notes and our other debt.
Illustration.    The following table illustrates the effect of leverage on returns from an investment in our common stock assuming various annual returns, net of interest expense. The calculations in the table below are hypothetical and actual returns may be higher or lower than those appearing below. The calculation assumes (i) $6.5 billion in total assets, (ii) an average cost of funds of 5.41%, (iii) $2.8 billion in debt outstanding and (iv) $3.7 billion of shareholders' equity.
Assumed Return on Our Portfolio (net of expenses)
 
(10
)%
 
(5
)%
 
0
 %
 
5
%
 
10
%
Corresponding Return to Stockholder
 
(21.7
)%
 
(12.9
)%
 
(4.1
)%
 
4.7
%
 
13.5
%

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The assumed portfolio return is required by regulation of the SEC and is not a prediction of, and does not represent, our projected or actual performance. Actual returns may be greater or less than those appearing in the table.
The Senior Convertible Notes and the Senior Unsecured Notes present other risks to holders of our common stock, including the possibility that such Notes could discourage an acquisition of us by a third party and accounting uncertainty.
Certain provisions of the Senior Convertible Notes and the Senior Unsecured Notes could make it more difficult or more expensive for a third party to acquire us. Upon the occurrence of certain transactions constituting a fundamental change, holders of the Senior Convertible Notes and the Senior Unsecured Notes will have the right, at their option, to require us to repurchase all of their Senior Convertible Notes and the Senior Unsecured Notes or any portion of the principal amount of such Senior Convertible Notes and the Senior Unsecured Notes in integral multiples of $1,000, in the case of the Senior Convertible Notes, the 2023 Notes and the 5.00% 2019 Notes, and $25, in the case of the 2022 Notes. We may also be required to increase the conversion rate or provide for conversion into the acquirer's capital stock in the event of certain fundamental changes with respect to the Senior Convertible Notes. These provisions could discourage an acquisition of us by a third party.
The accounting for convertible debt securities is subject to frequent scrutiny by the accounting regulatory bodies and is subject to change. We cannot predict if or when any such change could be made and any such change could have an adverse impact on our reported or future financial results. Any such impacts could adversely affect the market price of our common stock.
We may in the future determine to fund a portion of our investments with preferred stock, which would magnify the potential for gain or loss and the risks of investing in us in the same way as our borrowings.
Preferred stock, which is another form of leverage, has the same risks to our common stockholders as borrowings because the dividends on any preferred stock we issue must be cumulative. Payment of such dividends and repayment of the liquidation preference of such preferred stock must take preference over any dividends or other payments to our common stockholders, and preferred stockholders are not subject to any of our expenses or losses and are not entitled to participate in any income or appreciation in excess of their stated preference.
Holders of any preferred stock we might issue would have the right to elect members of the board of directors and class voting rights on certain matters.
Holders of any preferred stock we might issue, voting separately as a single class, would have the right to elect two members of the board of directors at all times and in the event dividends become two full years in arrears would have the right to elect a majority of the directors until such arrearage is completely eliminated. In addition, preferred stockholders have class voting rights on certain matters, including changes in fundamental investment restrictions and conversion to open-end status, and accordingly can veto any such changes. Restrictions imposed on the declarations and payment of dividends or other distributions to the holders of our common stock and preferred stock, both by the 1940 Act and by requirements imposed by rating agencies or the terms of our credit facilities, might impair our ability to maintain our qualification as a RIC for federal income tax purposes. While we would intend to redeem our preferred stock to the extent necessary to enable us to distribute our income as required to maintain our qualification as a RIC, there can be no assurance that such actions could be effected in time to meet the tax requirements.
In addition to regulatory restrictions that restrict our ability to raise capital, our credit facility contains various covenants which, if not complied with, could accelerate repayment under the facility, thereby materially and adversely affecting our liquidity, financial condition and results of operations.
The agreement governing our credit facility requires us to comply with certain financial and operational covenants. These covenants include:
Restrictions on the level of indebtedness that we are permitted to incur in relation to the value of our assets;
Restrictions on our ability to incur liens; and
Maintenance of a minimum level of stockholders' equity.
As of June 30, 2014, we were in compliance with these covenants. However, our continued compliance with these covenants depends on many factors, some of which are beyond our control. Accordingly, there are no assurances that we will continue to comply with the covenants in our credit facility. Failure to comply with these covenants would result in a default under this facility which, if we were unable to obtain a waiver from the lenders thereunder, could result in an acceleration of repayments under the facility and thereby have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Failure to extend our existing credit facility, the revolving period of which is currently scheduled to expire on March 27, 2015, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial position and our ability to pay expenses and make distributions.
The revolving period for our credit facility with a syndicate of lenders is currently scheduled to terminate on March 27, 2015, with an additional two year amortization period (with distributions allowed) after the completion of the revolving period. During such two year amortization period, all principal payments on the pledged assets will be applied to reduce the balance. At the end of the two year amortization period, the remaining balance will become due if required by the lenders. If the credit facility is not renewed or extended by the participant banks by March 27, 2015, we will not be able to make further borrowings under the facility after such date and the outstanding principal balance on that date will be due and payable on March 27, 2017. As of June 30, 2014, we had $92.0 million of outstanding borrowings under our credit facility. Interest on borrowings under the credit facility is one-month LIBOR plus 275 basis points with no minimum LIBOR floor. Additionally, the lenders charge a fee on the unused portion of the credit facility equal to either 50 basis points if at least half of the credit facility is drawn or 100 basis points otherwise. The credit facility requires us to pledge assets as collateral in order to borrow under the credit facility. If we are unable to extend our facility or find a new source of borrowing on acceptable terms, we will be required to pay down the amounts outstanding under the facility during the two-year term-out period through one or more of the following: (1) principal collections on our securities pledged under the facility, (2) at our option, interest collections on our securities pledged under the facility and cash collections on our securities not pledged under the facility, or (3) possible liquidation of some or all of our loans and other assets, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial position and may force us to decrease or stop paying certain expenses and making distributions until the facility is repaid. In addition, our stock price could decline significantly, we would be restricted in our ability to acquire new investments and, in connection with our year-end audit, our independent registered accounting firm could raise an issue as to our ability to continue as a going concern.
Failure to refinance our existing Senior Notes could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial position.
Our Senior Notes mature at various dates from December 15, 2015 to October 15, 2043. If we are unable to refinance our Senior Notes or find a new source of borrowing on acceptable terms, we will be required to pay down the amounts outstanding at maturity under the facility during the two-year term-out period through one or more of the following: (1) borrowing additional funds under our then current credit facility, (2) issuance of additional common stock or (3) possible liquidation of some or all of our loans and other assets, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial position. In addition, our stock price could decline significantly; we would be restricted in our ability to acquire new investments and, in connection with our year-end audit, our independent registered accounting firm could raise an issue as to our ability to continue as a going concern.
The trading market or market value of our publicly issued debt securities may fluctuate.
Our publicly issued debt securities may or may not have an established trading market. We cannot assure our noteholders that a trading market for our publicly issued debt securities will ever develop or be maintained if developed. In addition to our creditworthiness, many factors may materially adversely affect the trading market for, and market value of, our publicly issued debt securities. These factors include, but are not limited to, the following:
the time remaining to the maturity of these debt securities;
the outstanding principal amount of debt securities with terms identical to these debt securities;
the ratings assigned by national statistical ratings agencies;
the general economic environment;
the supply of debt securities trading in the secondary market, if any;
the redemption or repayment features, if any, of these debt securities;
the level, direction and volatility of market interest rates generally; and
market rates of interest higher or lower than rates borne by the debt securities.
Our noteholders should also be aware that there may be a limited number of buyers when they decide to sell their debt securities. This too may materially adversely affect the market value of the debt securities or the trading market for the debt securities.

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Terms relating to redemption may materially adversely affect our noteholders return on any debt securities that we may issue.
If our noteholders' debt securities are redeemable at our option, we may choose to redeem their debt securities at times when prevailing interest rates are lower than the interest rate paid on their debt securities. In addition, if our noteholders' debt securities are subject to mandatory redemption, we may be required to redeem their debt securities also at times when prevailing interest rates are lower than the interest rate paid on their debt securities. In this circumstance, our noteholders may not be able to reinvest the redemption proceeds in a comparable security at an effective interest rate as high as their debt securities being redeemed.
Our shares of common stock have traded at a discount from net asset value and may do so again in the future, which could limit our ability to raise additional equity capital.
Shares of closed-end investment companies frequently trade at a market price that is less than the net asset value that is attributable to those shares. This characteristic of closed-end investment companies is separate and distinct from the risk that our net asset value per share may decline. It is not possible to predict whether any shares of our common stock will trade at, above, or below net asset value. In the past, the stocks of BDCs as an industry, including at times shares of our common stock, traded below net asset value as a result of concerns over liquidity, leverage restrictions and distribution requirements. When our common stock is trading below its net asset value per share, we will generally not be able to issue additional shares of our common stock at its market price without first obtaining approval for such issuance from our stockholders and our independent directors. At our 2013 annual meeting of stockholders held on December 6, 2013, our stockholders approved our ability, subject to the condition that the maximum number of shares salable below net asset value pursuant to this authority in any particular offering that could result in such dilution is limited to 25% of our then outstanding common stock immediately prior to each such offering, to sell shares of our common stock at any level of discount from net asset value per share during the 12 month period following December 6, 2013.
There is a risk that investors in our common stock may not receive dividends or that our dividends may not grow over time and investors in our debt securities may not receive all of the interest income to which they are entitled.
We intend to make distributions on a quarterly basis to our stockholders out of assets legally available for distribution. We cannot assure you that we will achieve investment results that will allow us to make a specified level of cash distributions or year-to-year increases in cash distributions. If we declare a dividend and if more stockholders opt to receive cash distributions rather than participate in our dividend reinvestment plan, we may be forced to sell some of our investments in order to make cash dividend payments.
In addition, due to the asset coverage test applicable to us as a BDC, we may be limited in our ability to make distributions. Further, if we invest a greater amount of assets in equity securities that do not pay current dividends, it could reduce the amount available for distribution.
The above-referenced restrictions on distributions may also inhibit our ability to make required interest payments to holders of our debt, which may cause a default under the terms of our debt agreements. Such a default could materially increase our cost of raising capital, as well as cause us to incur penalties under the terms of our debt agreements.
Investing in our securities may involve a high degree of risk and is highly speculative.
The investments we make in accordance with our investment objective may result in a higher amount of risk than alternative investment options and volatility or loss of principal. Our investments in portfolio companies may be speculative and aggressive, and therefore, an investment in our shares may not be suitable for someone with low risk tolerance.
Our stockholders will experience dilution in their ownership percentage if they opt out of our dividend reinvestment plan.
All dividends declared in cash payable to stockholders that are participants in our dividend reinvestment plan are automatically reinvested in shares of our common stock. As a result, our stockholders that opt out of our dividend reinvestment plan will experience dilution in their ownership percentage of our common stock over time.
Sales of substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market may have an adverse effect on the market price of our common stock.
Sales of substantial amounts of our common stock, or the availability of such common stock for sale (including as a result of the conversion of our Senior Convertible Notes into common stock), could adversely affect the prevailing market prices for our common stock. If this occurs and continues, it could impair our ability to raise additional capital through the sale of securities should we desire to do so.

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If we sell shares of our common stock or securities to subscribe for or are convertible into shares of our common stock at a discount to our net asset value per share, stockholders who do not participate in such sale will experience immediate dilution in an amount that may be material.
At our 2013 annual meeting of stockholders held on December 6, 2013, our stockholders approved our ability, subject to the condition that the maximum number of shares salable below net asset value pursuant to this authority in any particular offering that could result in such dilution is limited to 25% of our then outstanding common stock immediately prior to each such offering, to sell shares of our common stock at any level of discount from net asset value per share during the 12 month period following December 6, 2013. The issuance or sale by us of shares of our common stock or securities to subscribe for or are convertible into shares of our common stock at a discount to net asset value poses a risk of dilution to our stockholders. In particular, stockholders who do not purchase additional shares of common stock at or below the discounted price in proportion to their current ownership will experience an immediate decrease in net asset value per share (as well as in the aggregate net asset value of their shares of common stock if they do not participate at all). These stockholders will also experience a disproportionately greater decrease in their participation in our earnings and assets and their voting power than the increase we experience in our assets, potential earning power and voting interests from such issuance or sale. In addition, such sales may adversely affect the price at which our common stock trades. We have sold shares of our common stock at prices below net asset value per share in the past and may do so to the future. We have not sold any shares of our common stock at prices below net asset value per share since July 18, 2011.
Our ability to enter into transactions with our affiliates is restricted.
We are prohibited under the 1940 Act from knowingly participating in certain transactions with our affiliates without the prior approval of our independent directors. Any person that owns, directly or indirectly, 5% or more of our outstanding voting securities is our affiliate for purposes of the 1940 Act and we are generally prohibited from buying or selling any security or other property from or to such affiliate, absent the prior approval of our independent directors. The 1940 Act also prohibits "joint" transactions with an affiliate, which could include investments in the same portfolio company (whether at the same or different times), without prior approval of our independent directors. Subject to certain limited exceptions, we are prohibited from buying or selling any security or other property from or to the Investment Adviser and its affiliates and persons with whom we are in a control relationship, or entering into joint transactions with any such person, absent the prior approval of the SEC.
On February 10, 2014, we received an exemptive order from the SEC (the "Order") that gave us the ability to negotiate terms other than price and quantity of co-investment transactions with other funds managed by the Investment Adviser or certain affiliates, including Priority Senior Secured Income Fund, Inc. and Pathway Energy Infrastructure Fund, Inc., subject to the conditions included therein. In certain situations where co-investment with one or more funds managed by the Investment Adviser or its affiliates is not covered by the Order, such as when there is an opportunity to invest in different securities of the same issuer, the personnel of the Investment Adviser or its affiliates will need to decide which fund will proceed with the investment. Such personnel will make these determinations based on policies and procedures, which are designed to reasonably ensure that investment opportunities are allocated fairly and equitably among affiliated funds over time and in a manner that is consistent with applicable laws, rules and regulations. Moreover, except in certain circumstances, when relying on the Order, we will be unable to invest in any issuer in which one or more funds managed by the Investment Adviser or its affiliates has previously invested.
The market price of our securities may fluctuate significantly.
The market price and liquidity of the market for our securities may be significantly affected by numerous factors, some of which are beyond our control and may not be directly related to our operating performance. These factors include:
significant volatility in the market price and trading volume of securities of business development companies or other companies in the energy industry, which are not necessarily related to the operating performance of these companies;
price and volume fluctuations in the overall stock market from time to time;
changes in regulatory policies or tax guidelines, particularly with respect to RICs or business development companies;
loss of RIC qualification;
changes in earnings or variations in operating results;
changes in the value of our portfolio of investments;
any shortfall in revenue or net income or any increase in losses from levels expected by investors or securities analysts;
departure of one or more of Prospect Capital Management's key personnel;

47


operating performance of companies comparable to us;
short-selling pressure with respect to shares of our common stock or BDCs generally;
future sales of our securities convertible into or exchangeable or exercisable for our common stock or the conversion of such securities, including the Senior Convertible Notes;
uncertainty surrounding the strength of the U.S. economic recovery;
concerns regarding European sovereign debt;
changes in prevailing interest rates;
litigation matters;
general economic trends and other external factors; and
loss of a major funding source.
In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company's securities, securities class action litigation has, from time to time, been brought against that company.
If our stock price fluctuates significantly, we may be the target of securities litigation in the future. Securities litigation could result in substantial costs and divert management's attention and resources from our business.
There is a risk that you may not receive distributions or that our distributions may not grow over time.
We have made and intend to continue to make distributions on a monthly basis to our stockholders out of assets legally available for distribution. We cannot assure you that we will achieve investment results or maintain a tax status that will allow or require any specified level of cash distributions or year-to-year increases in cash distributions. In addition, due to the asset coverage test applicable to us as a business development company, we may be limited in our ability to make distributions.
Provisions of the Maryland General Corporation Law and of our charter and bylaws could deter takeover attempts and have an adverse impact on the price of our common stock.
Our charter and bylaws and the Maryland General Corporation Law contain provisions that may have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a transaction or a change in control that might involve a premium price for our stockholders or otherwise be in their best interest. These provisions may prevent stockholders from being able to sell shares of our common stock at a premium over the current of prevailing market prices.
Our charter provides for the classification of our Board of Directors into three classes of directors, serving staggered three-year terms, which may render a change of control or removal of our incumbent management more difficult. Furthermore, any and all vacancies on our Board of Directors will be filled generally only by the affirmative vote of a majority of the remaining directors in office, even if the remaining directors do not constitute a quorum, and any director elected to fill a vacancy will serve for the remainder of the full term until a successor is elected and qualifies.
Our Board of Directors is authorized to create and issue new series of shares, to classify or reclassify any unissued shares of stock into one or more classes or series, including preferred stock and, without stockholder approval, to amend our charter to increase or decrease the number of shares of common stock that we have authority to issue, which could have the effect of diluting a stockholder's ownership interest. Prior to the issuance of shares of common stock of each class or series, including any reclassified series, our Board of Directors is required by our governing documents to set the terms, preferences, conversion or other rights, voting powers, restrictions, limitations as to dividends or other distributions, qualifications and terms or conditions of redemption for each class or series of shares of stock.

48


Our charter and bylaws also provide that our Board of Directors has the exclusive power to adopt, alter or repeal any provision of our bylaws, and to make new bylaws. The Maryland General Corporation Law also contains certain provisions that may limit the ability of a third party to acquire control of us, such as:
The Maryland Business Combination Act, which, subject to certain limitations, prohibits certain business combinations between us and an "interested stockholder" (defined generally as any person who beneficially owns 10% or more of the voting power of the common stock or an affiliate thereof) for five years after the most recent date on which the stockholder becomes an interested stockholder and, thereafter, imposes special minimum price provisions and special stockholder voting requirements on these combinations.
The Maryland Control Share Acquisition Act, which provides that "control shares" of a Maryland corporation (defined as shares of common stock which, when aggregated with other shares of common stock controlled by the stockholder, entitles the stockholder to exercise one of three increasing ranges of voting power in electing directors, as described more fully below) acquired in a "control share acquisition" (defined as the direct or indirect acquisition of ownership or control of "control shares") have no voting rights except to the extent approved by stockholders by the affirmative vote of at least two-thirds of all the votes entitled to be cast on the matter, excluding all interested shares of common stock.
The provisions of the Maryland Business Combination Act will not apply, however, if our Board of Directors adopts a resolution that any business combination between us and any other person will be exempt from the provisions of the Maryland Business Combination Act. Our Board of Directors has adopted a resolution that any business combination between us and any other person is exempted from the provisions of the Maryland Business Combination Act, provided that the business combination is first approved by the Board of Directors, including a majority of the directors who are not interested persons as defined in the 1940 Act. There can be no assurance that this resolution will not be altered or repealed in whole or in part at any time. If the resolution is altered or repealed, the provisions of the Maryland Business Combination Act may discourage others from trying to acquire control of us.
As permitted by Maryland law, our bylaws contain a provision exempting from the Maryland Control Share Acquisition Act any and all acquisitions by any person of our common stock. Although our bylaws include such a provision, such a provision may also be amended or eliminated by our Board of Directors at any time in the future, provided that we will notify the Division of Investment Management at the SEC prior to amending or eliminating this provision. However, as noted above, the SEC has recently taken the position that the Maryland Control Share Acquisition Act is inconsistent with the 1940 Act and may not be invoked by a BDC. It is the view of the staff of the SEC that opting into the Maryland Control Share Acquisition Act would be acting in a manner inconsistent with section 18(i) of the 1940 Act.
Your interest in us may be diluted if you do not fully exercise your subscription rights in any rights offering. In addition, if the subscription price is less than our net asset value per share, then you will experience an immediate dilution of the aggregate net asset value of your shares.
In the event we issue subscription rights, stockholders who do not fully exercise their subscription rights should expect that they will, at the completion of a rights offering pursuant to this prospectus, own a smaller proportional interest in us than would otherwise be the case if they fully exercised their rights. We cannot state precisely the amount of any such dilution in share ownership because we do not know at this time what proportion of the shares will be purchased as a result of such rights offering.
In addition, if the subscription price is less than the net asset value per share of our common stock, then our stockholders would experience an immediate dilution of the aggregate net asset value of their shares as a result of the offering. The amount of any decrease in net asset value is not predictable because it is not known at this time what the subscription price and net asset value per share will be on the expiration date of a rights offering or what proportion of the shares will be purchased as a result of such rights offering. Such dilution could be substantial.
We may in the future choose to pay dividends in our own stock, in which case our stockholders may be required to pay tax in excess of the cash they receive.
We may distribute taxable dividends that are payable in part in our stock. The IRS has issued a private letter ruling on cash/stock dividends paid by us if certain requirements are satisfied, and the ruling permits us to declare such taxable cash/stock dividends, up to 80% in stock, with respect to our taxable years ending August 31, 2014 and August 31, 2015. Taxable stockholders receiving such dividends would be required to include the full amount of the dividend as ordinary income (or as long-term capital gain to the extent such distribution is properly designated as a capital gain dividend) to the extent of our current and accumulated earnings and profits for United States federal income tax purposes. As a result, a U.S. Stockholder (as defined in "Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations") may be required to pay tax with respect to such dividends in excess of any cash received. If a U.S. Stockholder sells the stock it receives as a dividend in order to pay this tax, it may be subject to transaction fees (e.g. broker fees

49


or transfer agent fees) and the sales proceeds may be less than the amount included in income with respect to the dividend, depending on the market price of its stock at the time of the sale. Furthermore, with respect to Non-U.S. Stockholders (as defined in "Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations"), we may be required to withhold U.S. tax with respect to such dividends, including in respect of all or a portion of such dividend that is payable in stock. In addition, if a significant number of our stockholders determine to sell shares of our stock in order to pay taxes owed on dividends, it may put downward pressure on the trading price of our stock. It is unclear whether and to what extent we will be able to pay dividends in cash and our stock.
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
Not applicable.
Item 2. Properties
We do not own any real estate or other physical properties materially important to our operation. Our principal executive offices are located at 10 East 40th Street, New York, New York 10016, where we occupy our office space pursuant to our Administration Agreement with Prospect Administration. The office facilities, which are shared with the Investment Adviser and Administrator, consist of approximately 30,216 square feet, with various leases expiring up to and through 2023. We believe that our office facilities are suitable and adequate for our business as currently conducted.
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
From time to time, we may become involved in various investigations, claims and legal proceedings that arise in the ordinary course of our business. These matters may relate to intellectual property, employment, tax, regulation, contract or other matters. The resolution of such of these matters as may arise will be subject to various uncertainties and, even if such claims are without merit, could result in the expenditure of significant financial and managerial resources. We are not aware of any such litigation as of June 30, 2014.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Not applicable.

50


PART II
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Our common stock is traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol "PSEC."
The following table sets forth, for the quarterly reporting periods indicated, the net asset value per share of our common stock and the high and low sales prices for our common stock, as reported on the NASDAQ Global Select Market. Our common stock historically has traded at prices both above and below its net asset value. There can be no assurance, however, that such premium or discount, as applicable, to net asset value will be maintained. See also ‘‘Item 1A. Risk Factors’’ in Part I of this report for additional information about the risks and uncertainties we face.
Year Ended
 
Net Asset Value Per Share(1)
 
Sales Price
 
Premium (Discount) of High Sales Price to Net Asset Value
 
Premium (Discount) of Low Sales Price to Net Asset Value
 
 
High
 
Low
 
 
June 30, 2013
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
First quarter
 
$
10.88

 
$
12.21

 
$
10.83

 
12.2
%
 
(0.5
%)
Second quarter
 
10.81

 
11.98

 
9.89

 
10.8
%
 
(8.5
%)
Third quarter
 
10.71

 
11.49

 
10.91

 
7.3
%
 
1.9
%
Fourth quarter
 
10.72

 
11.11

 
10.08

 
3.6
%
 
(6.0
%)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
June 30, 2014
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
First quarter
 
$
10.72

 
$
11.61

 
$
10.76

 
8.3
%
 
0.4
%
Second quarter
 
10.73

 
11.48

 
10.80

 
7.0
%
 
0.7
%
Third quarter
 
10.68

 
11.39

 
10.73

 
6.6
%
 
0.5
%
Fourth quarter
 
10.56

 
10.99

 
9.64

 
4.1
%
 
(8.7
%)
(1)
Net asset value per share is determined as of the last day in the relevant quarter and therefore may not reflect the net asset value per share on the date of the high and low sales prices. The net asset values shown are based on outstanding shares at the end of the relevant quarter.
As of August 22, 2014, there were 127 shareholders of record of our common stock. This figure does not include a substantially greater number of beneficial holders of our common stock, whose shares are held in the names of brokers, dealers and clearing agencies.
Distribution Policy
Through March 2010, we made quarterly distributions to our stockholders out of assets legally available for distribution. In June 2010, we changed our distribution policy from a quarterly payment to a monthly payment. To the extent prudent and practicable, we currently intend to continue making distributions on a monthly basis. Our ability to pay distributions could be affected by future business performance, liquidity, capital needs, alternative investment opportunities and loan covenants. Our distributions, if any, will be determined by our Board of Directors. Certain amounts of the monthly distributions may from time to time be paid out of our capital rather than from earnings for the quarter as a result of our deliberate planning or by accounting reclassifications.
As a RIC, we generally are not subject to U.S. federal income tax on income and gains we distribute each taxable year to our stockholders, provided that in such taxable year, we distribute an amount equal to at least 90% of our investment company taxable income (as defined by the Code) to our stockholders. In addition, we will be subject to a 4% non-deductible U.S. federal excise tax on certain undistributed income unless we distribute in a timely manner an amount at least equal to the sum of (i) 98% of our ordinary income recognized during the calendar year, (ii) 98.2% of our capital gain net income, as defined by the Code, recognized for the one year period ending October 31 in that calendar year and (iii) any income recognized, but not distributed, in preceding years.
We had no excise tax liability for the calendar year ended December 31, 2013. Through June 30, 2014, we have an accrued prepaid excise tax balance of $2.2 million because we have made estimated excise tax payments in excess of our expected excise tax liability for the calendar year ending December 31, 2014. Tax characteristics of all distributions will be reported to stockholders, as appropriate, on Form 1099-DIV after the end of the calendar year.

51


In addition, although we currently intend to distribute realized net capital gains (which we define as net long-term capital gains in excess of short-term capital losses), if any, at least annually out of the assets legally available for such distributions, we may decide in the future to retain such capital gains for investment. In such event, the consequences of our retention of net capital gains are described under "Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations." We can offer no assurance that we will achieve results that will permit the payment of any cash distributions and, if we issue senior securities, we may be prohibited from making distributions if doing so causes us to fail to maintain the asset coverage ratios stipulated by the 1940 Act or if distributions are limited by the terms of any of our borrowings.
During the years ended June 30, 2014 and 2013, we distributed approximately $403.2 million and $271.5 million, respectively, to our stockholders. The following table summarizes our distributions declared and payable for 2013 and 2014:
Declaration Date
 
Record Date
 
Payment Date
 
Amount Per Share
 
Amount Distributed (in thousands)
5/7/2012
 
7/31/2012
 
8/24/2012
 
$
0.101575

 
$
16,886

5/7/2012
 
8/31/2012
 
9/21/2012
 
0.101600

 
16,897

8/21/2012
 
9/28/2012
 
10/24/2012
 
0.101625

 
17,597

8/21/2012
 
10/31/2012
 
11/22/2012
 
0.101650

 
17,736

11/7/2012
 
11/30/2012
 
12/20/2012
 
0.101675

 
21,308

12/7/2012
 
12/31/2012
 
1/23/2013
 
0.110000

 
23,669

12/7/2012
 
1/31/2013
 
2/20/2013
 
0.110025

 
24,641

2/7/2013
 
2/28/2013
 
3/21/2013
 
0.110050

 
25,307

2/7/2013
 
3/29/2013
 
4/18/2013
 
0.110075

 
26,267

2/7/2013
 
4/30/2013
 
5/23/2013
 
0.110100

 
26,620

5/6/2013
 
5/31/2013
 
6/20/2013
 
0.110125

 
27,280

5/6/2013
 
6/28/2013
 
7/18/2013
 
0.110150

 
27,299

Total declared and payable for 2013
 
 
$
271,507

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5/6/2013
 
7/31/2013
 
8/22/2013
 
$
0.110175

 
$
28,001

5/6/2013
 
8/30/2013
 
9/19/2013
 
0.110200

 
28,759

6/17/2013
 
9/30/2013
 
10/24/2013
 
0.110225

 
29,915

6/17/2013
 
10/31/2013
 
11/21/2013
 
0.110250

 
31,224

6/17/2013
 
11/29/2013
 
12/19/2013
 
0.110275

 
32,189

6/17/2013
 
12/31/2013
 
1/23/2014
 
0.110300

 
33,229

8/21/2013
 
1/31/2014
 
2/20/2014
 
0.110325

 
34,239

8/21/2013
 
2/28/2014
 
3/20/2014
 
0.110350

 
35,508

8/21/2013
 
3/31/2014
 
4/17/2014
 
0.110375

 
36,810

11/4/2013
 
4/30/2014
 
5/22/2014
 
0.110400

 
37,649

11/4/2013
 
5/30/2014
 
6/19/2014
 
0.110425

 
37,822

11/4/2013
 
6/30/2014
 
7/24/2014
 
0.110450

 
37,843

Total declared and payable for 2014
 
 
$
403,188

Dividends and distributions to common stockholders are recorded on the ex-dividend date. As such, the table above includes distributions with record dates during the years ended June 30, 2014 and 2013. It does not include distributions previously declared to stockholders of record on any future dates, as those amounts are not yet determinable.

52


Dividend Reinvestment Plan
We maintain an "opt out" dividend reinvestment plan for our common stockholders. As a result, if we declare a distribution (as discussed above), stockholders’ cash distributions will be automatically reinvested in additional shares of our common stock, unless they specifically opt out of the dividend reinvestment plan so as to receive cash distributions. Stockholders who receive distributions in the form of stock are subject to the same U.S. federal, state and local tax consequences as are stockholders who elect to receive their distributions in cash. Stockholders are advised to consult with their brokers or financial institutions, as appropriate, with respect to the administration of their dividends and related instructions. See also "Dividend Reinvestment Plan" in Part I of this report for additional information.
We primarily use newly-issued shares to implement the plan, whether our shares are trading at a premium or at a discount to net asset value. However, we reserve the right to purchase shares in the open market in connection with the implementation of the plan. Our Board of Directors determines how the stock to be distributed as part of the plan is made available.
During the years ended June 30, 2014 and 2013, we distributed 1,408,070 and 1,450,578 shares of our common stock, respectively, in connection with the dividend reinvestment plan. All of the shares distributed were new issues. The following table summarizes the shares issued through the reinvestment of dividends in 2013 and 2014:
Record Date
 
Payment Date
 
Shares Issued
 
Value of Shares
(in thousands)
 
% of Distribution
6/29/2012
 
7/24/2012
 
205,834

 
$
2,287

 
16.1
%
7/31/2012
 
8/24/2012
 
75,543

 
866

 
5.1
%
8/31/2012
 
9/21/2012
 
74,494

 
878

 
5.2
%
9/28/2012
 
10/24/2012
 
83,200

 
981

 
5.6
%
10/31/2012
 
11/22/2012
 
84,904

 
904

 
5.1
%
11/30/2012
 
12/20/2012
 
100,552

 
1,111

 
5.2
%
12/31/2012
 
1/23/2013
 
160,182

 
1,820

 
7.7
%
1/31/2013
 
2/20/2013
 
160,941

 
1,820

 
7.4
%
2/28/2013
 
3/21/2013
 
132,237

 
1,470

 
5.8
%
3/29/2013
 
4/18/2013
 
138,087

 
1,444

 
5.5
%
4/30/2013
 
5/23/2013
 
117,497

 
1,277

 
4.8
%
5/31/2013
 
6/20/2013
 
117,107

 
1,229

 
4.5
%
Total issued in 2013
 
1,450,578

 
$
16,087

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6/28/2013
 
7/18/2013
 
109,437

 
$
1,208

 
4.4
%
7/31/2013
 
8/22/2013
 
113,610

 
1,246

 
4.4
%
8/30/2013
 
9/19/2013
 
132,597

 
1,540

 
5.4
%
9/30/2013
 
10/24/2013
 
135,212

 
1,548

 
5.2
%
10/31/2013
 
11/21/2013
 
206,586

 
2,343

 
7.5
%
11/29/2013
 
12/19/2013
 
106,620

 
1,208

 
3.8
%
12/31/2013
 
1/23/2014
 
109,087

 
1,237

 
3.7
%
1/31/2014
 
2/20/2014
 
88,112

 
995

 
2.9
%
2/28/2014
 
3/20/2014
 
93,735

 
1,011

 
2.8
%
3/31/2014
 
4/17/2014
 
86,333

 
938

 
2.5
%
4/30/2014
 
5/22/2014
 
114,111

 
1,132

 
3.0
%
5/30/2014
 
6/19/2014
 
112,630

 
1,168

 
3.1
%
Total issued in 2014
 
1,408,070

 
$
15,574

 
 
Registered stockholders who opt out of the dividend reinvestment plan must notify the plan administrator prior to the payment date in order for that distribution to be paid in cash. As such, the table above includes distributions with payment dates during the years ended June 30, 2014 and 2013. It does not include distributions previously declared and recorded as payable to stockholders on any future dates, as those amounts are not yet determinable.


53


Stock Performance Graph
The following graph sets forth the cumulative total shareholder return to our shareholders during the five-year period ended June 30, 2014, as well as the corresponding returns on an overall stock market index (S&P 500 Index) and our peer group index (S&P 500 Financials Select Sector Index). The graph is based on historical stock prices and measures total shareholder return, which takes into account both changes in stock price and dividends. The total return assumes that dividends were reinvested daily and is based on a $100 investment on June 30, 2009.
The graph and other information furnished under this Part II, Item 5 of this annual report on Form 10-K shall not be deemed to be "soliciting material" or to be "filed" with the SEC or subject to Regulation 14A or 14C, or to the liabilities of Section 18 of the Exchange Act. The stock price performance included in the above graph is not necessarily indicative of future stock performance.


54


Item 6. Selected Financial Data
The following selected financial data should be read in conjunction with "Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and consolidated financial statements and notes thereto contained in "Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" of this report. All amounts are in thousands except per share data and number of portfolio companies at year end.
 
Year Ended June 30,
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
Summary of Operations
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total investment income
$
712,291

 
$
576,336

 
$
320,910

 
$
169,476

 
$
114,559

Total operating expenses
355,068

 
251,412

 
134,226

 
75,255

 
47,369

Net investment income
357,223

 
324,924

 
186,684

 
94,221

 
67,190

Net realized and unrealized (losses) gains
(38,203
)
 
(104,068
)
 
4,220

 
24,017

 
(47,565
)
Net increase in net assets resulting from operations
319,020

 
220,856

 
190,904

 
118,238

 
19,625

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Per Share Data
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net investment income(1)
$
1.19

 
$
1.57

 
$
1.63

 
$
1.10

 
$
1.13

Net increase in net assets resulting from operations(1)
1.06

 
1.07

 
1.67

 
1.38

 
0.33

Dividends to shareholders
(1.32
)
 
(1.28
)
 
(1.22
)
 
(1.21
)
 
(1.33
)
Net asset value at end of year
10.56

 
10.72

 
10.83

 
10.36

 
10.30

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Balance Sheet Data
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total assets
$
6,477,269

 
$
4,448,217

 
$
2,255,254

 
$
1,549,317

 
$
832,695

Total debt outstanding
2,773,051

 
1,683,002

 
664,138

 
406,700

 
100,300

Net assets
3,618,182

 
2,656,494

 
1,511,974

 
1,114,357

 
711,424

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other Data
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Investment purchases for the year(2)
$
2,952,456

 
$
3,103,217

 
$
1,120,659

 
$
953,337

 
$
364,788

Investment sales and repayments for the year
$
787,069

 
$
931,534

 
$
500,952

 
$
285,562

 
$
136,221

Number of portfolio companies at year end
143

 
124

 
85

 
72

 
58

Total return based on market value(3)
10.9
%
 
6.2
%
 
27.2
%
 
17.2
%
 
17.7
%
Total return based on net asset value(3)
11.0
%
 
10.9
%
 
18.0
%
 
12.5
%
 
(6.8
%)
Weighted average yield on debt portfolio at year end(4)
12.1
%
 
13.6
%
 
13.9
%
 
12.8
%
 
16.2
%
(1)
Per share data is based on the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period presented (except for dividends to shareholders which is based on actual rate per share).
(2)
Investment purchases for the year ended June 30, 2010 includes $207,126 of portfolio investments acquired from Patriot Capital Funding, Inc.
(3)
Total return based on market value is based on the change in market price per share between the opening and ending market prices per share in each period and assumes that dividends are reinvested in accordance with our dividend reinvestment plan. Total return based on net asset value is based upon the change in net asset value per share between the opening and ending net asset values per share in each period and assumes that dividends are reinvested in accordance with our dividend reinvestment plan.
(4)
Excludes equity investments and non-performing loans.

55


Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
(All figures in this item are in thousands except share, per share and other data.)
The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and related notes and other financial information appearing elsewhere in this annual report. In addition to historical information, the following discussion and other parts of this annual report contain forward-looking information that involves risks and uncertainties. Our actual results could differ materially from those anticipated by such forward-looking information due to the factors discussed in Item 1A "Risk Factors" and "Forward-Looking Statements" appearing elsewhere herein.
Overview
We are a financial services company that primarily lends to and invests in middle market privately-held companies. We are a closed-end investment company incorporated in Maryland. We have elected to be regulated as a business development company ("BDC") under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the "1940 Act"). As a BDC, we have elected to be treated as a regulated investment company ("RIC"), under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (the "Internal Revenue Code" or the "Code"). We invest primarily in senior and subordinated debt and equity of companies in need of capital for acquisitions, divestitures, growth, development, recapitalizations and other purposes. We work with the management teams or financial sponsors to seek investments with historical cash flows, asset collateral or contracted pro-forma cash flows.
We currently have nine origination strategies in which we make investments: (1) lending in private equity sponsored transactions, (2) lending directly to companies not owned by private equity firms, (3) control investments in corporate operating companies, (4) control investments in financial companies, (5) investments in structured credit, (6) real estate investments, (7) investments in syndicated debt, (8) aircraft leasing and (9) online lending. We continue to evaluate other origination strategies in the ordinary course of business with no specific tops-down allocation to any single origination strategy.
Lending in Private Equity Sponsored Transactions – We make loans to companies which are controlled by leading private equity firms. This debt can take the form of first lien, second lien, unitranche or unsecured loans. In making these investments, we look for a diversified customer base, recurring demand for the product or service, barriers to entry, strong historical cash flow and experienced management teams. These loans typically have significant equity subordinate to our loan position. Historically, this strategy has comprised approximately 50%-60% of our business, but more recently it is less than 50% of our business.
Lending Directly to Companies – We provide debt financing to companies owned by non-private equity firms, the company founder, a management team or a family. Here, in addition to the strengths we look for in a sponsored transaction, we also look for the alignment with the management team with significant invested capital. This strategy often has less competition than the private equity sponsor strategy because such company financing needs are not easily addressed by banks and often require more diligence preparation. Direct lending can result in higher returns and lower leverage than sponsor transactions and may include warrants or equity to us. Historically, this strategy has comprised approximately 5%-15% of our business, but more recently it is less than 5% of our business.
Control Investments in Corporate Operating Companies – This strategy involves acquiring controlling stakes in non-financial operating companies. Our investments in these companies are generally structured as a combination of yield-producing debt and equity.  We provide certainty of closure to our counterparties, give the seller personal liquidity and generally look for management to continue on in their current roles. This strategy has comprised approximately 10%-15% of our business.
Control Investments in Financial Companies – This strategy involves acquiring controlling stakes in financial companies, including consumer direct lending, sub-prime auto lending and other strategies. Our investments in these companies are generally structured as a combination of yield-producing debt and equity. These investments are often structured in a tax-efficient RIC-compliant partnership, enhancing returns. This strategy has comprised approximately 5%-15% of our business.
Investments in Structured Credit – We make investments in collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”), generally taking a significant position in the subordinated interests (equity) of the CLOs. The CLOs include a diversified portfolio of broadly syndicated loans and do not have direct exposure to real estate, mortgages, sub-prime debt, or consumer based debt. The CLOs in which we invest are managed by top-tier collateral managers that have been thoroughly diligenced prior to investment. This strategy has comprised approximately 10%-20% of our business.

56


Real Estate Investments – We make investments in real estate through our three wholly-owned tax-efficient real estate investment trusts ("REITs"), American Property REIT Corp., National Property REIT Corp. and United Property REIT Corp. (collectively, "our REITs"). Our real estate investments are in various classes of fully developed and occupied real estate properties that generate current yields. We seek to identify properties that have historically high occupancy and steady cash flow generation. Our REITs partner with established property managers with experience in managing the property type to manage such properties after acquisition. This is a more recent investment strategy that has comprised approximately 5%-10% of our business.
Investments in Syndicated Debt – On an opportunistic basis, we make investments in loans and high yield bonds that have been sold to a syndicate of buyers. Here we look for investments with attractive risk-adjusted returns after we have completed a fundamental credit analysis. These investments are purchased with a long term, buy-and-hold outlook and we look to provide significant structuring input by providing anchoring orders. This strategy has comprised approximately 5%-10% of our business.
Aircraft Leasing – We invest debt as well as equity in aircraft assets subject to commercial leases to credit-worthy airlines across the globe. These investments present attractive return opportunities due to cash flow consistency from long-lived assets coupled with hard asset collateral. We seek to deliver risk-adjusted returns with strong downside protection by analyzing relative value characteristics across the spectrum of aircraft types of all vintages. Our target portfolio includes both in-production and out-of-production jet and turboprop aircraft and engines, operated by airlines across the globe. This strategy comprised approximately 1.5% of our business in the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014.
Online Lending – We make investments in loans originated by certain consumer loan and small and medium sized business (“SME”) originators. We purchase each loan in its entirety (i.e., a “whole loan”). The borrowers are consumers and SMEs. The loans are typically serviced by the originators of the loans. This strategy comprised approximately 1% of our business in the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014.
We invest primarily in first and second lien secured loans and unsecured debt, which in some cases includes an equity component. First and second lien secured loans generally are senior debt instruments that rank ahead of unsecured debt of a given portfolio company. These loans also have the benefit of security interests on the assets of the portfolio company, which may rank ahead of or be junior to other security interests. Our investments in CLOs are subordinated to senior loans and are generally unsecured. We invest in debt and equity positions of CLOs which are a form of securitization in which the cash flows of a portfolio of loans are pooled and passed on to different classes of owners in various tranches. Our CLO investments are derived from portfolios of corporate debt securities which are generally risk rated from BB to B.
We hold many of our control investments in a two-tier structure consisting of a holding company and one or more related operating companies. These holding companies serve various business purposes including concentration of management teams, optimization of third party borrowing costs, improvement of supplier, customer, and insurance terms, and enhancement of co-investments by the management teams. In these cases, our investment in the holding company, generally as equity, its equity investment in the operating company and along with any debt from us directly to the operating company structure represents our total exposure for the investment. As of June 30, 2014, as shown in our Consolidated Schedule of Investments, the cost basis and fair value of our investment in controlled companies is $1,719,242 and $1,640,454, respectively. This structure gives rise to several of the risks described in our public documents and highlighted above in Part I, Item 1A of this report. Effective for periods commencing on and after July 1, 2014, we will consolidate all wholly-owned and substantially wholly-owned holding companies formed by us for the purpose of holding our controlled investments in operating companies. We do not anticipate any significant effects of consolidating these holding companies as they hold minimal assets other than their investments in the controlled operating companies. Investment company accounting prohibits the consolidation of any operating companies.
We seek to be a long-term investor with our portfolio companies. The aggregate fair value of our portfolio investments was $6,253,739 and $4,172,852 as of June 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively. During the year ended June 30, 2014, our net cost of investments increased by $2,115,744, or 49.7%, as a result of forty-seven new investments, four revolver advances and several follow-on investments of $2,937,311, payment-in-kind interest of $15,145, structuring fees of $45,087 and net amortization of discounts and premiums of $46,297, while we received full repayments on twenty-one investments, sold eight investments, and received several partial prepayments and amortization payments totaling $787,069.
Compared to the end of last fiscal year (ended June 30, 2013), net assets increased by $961,688, or 36.2%, during the year ended June 30, 2014, from $2,656,494 to $3,618,182. This increase resulted from the issuance of new shares of our common stock (less offering costs) in the amount of $1,030,282, dividend reinvestments of $15,574, and $319,020 from operations. These increases, in turn, were offset by $403,188 in dividend distributions to our stockholders. The $319,020 from operations is net of the following: net investment income of $357,223, net realized loss on investments of $3,346, and net change in unrealized depreciation on investments of $34,857.

57


Fourth Quarter Highlights
Investment Transactions
During the three months ended June 30, 2014, we acquired $386,642 of new investments, completed follow-on investments in existing portfolio companies totaling approximately $55,360, and recorded PIK interest of $2,102, resulting in gross investment originations of $444,104. During the three months ended June 30, 2014, we received full repayments on five investments, and received several partial prepayments and amortization payments totaling $169,617. The more significant of these transactions are discussed in "Portfolio Investment Activity."
SEC Matter
On May 6, 2014, we announced in our filing on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2014 that the SEC Staff had asserted certain of our wholly-owned holding companies were investment companies, such companies were required to be consolidated in our historical financial results and financial position, and restatement of such financial statements was needed. At that time, we disclosed that we disagreed with the views of the SEC Staff and wished to appeal the conclusion through the Office of the Chief Accountant. On June 10, 2014, based on those discussions with the Office of the Chief Accountant, we concluded the following:
Our historical non-consolidation of wholly-owned and substantially wholly-owned holding companies did not require restatement of our prior period financial statements.
Upon our adoption of ASU 2013-08 for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2015, we will begin consolidating on a prospective basis certain of our wholly-owned and substantially wholly-owned holding companies formed by us in order to facilitate our investment strategy.
While we were in discussions with the SEC, we elected to suspend our debt and equity raising activities for the remainder of the quarter and continuing through the filing of this Form 10-K. This curtailment of capital raising activities suppressed our levels of origination and growth in the fourth quarter of the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014. This reduction in originations suppressed our level of structuring fees recognized and reduced our earnings for the quarter. Originations were $1,343,356 in the quarter ended March 31, 2014 versus $444,104 in the quarter ended June 30, 2014. As a result, structuring fees fell from $24,659 in the quarter ended March 31, 2014 to $5,026 in the quarter ended June 30, 2014.
Equity Issuance
During the three months ended June 30, 2014, we sold 7,711,389 shares of our common stock at an average price of $10.91 per share, and raised $84,145 of gross proceeds, under our at-the-market offering program (the "ATM Program"). Net proceeds were $83,308 after commissions to the broker-dealer on shares sold and offering costs.
On April 17, 2014, May 22, 2014 and June 19, 2014, we issued 86,333, 114,111 and 112,630 shares of our common stock in connection with the dividend reinvestment plan, respectively.
Dividend
On May 6, 2014, we announced the declaration of monthly dividends in the following amounts and with the following dates:
$0.110550 per share for October 2014 to holders of record on October 31, 2014 with a payment date of November 20, 2014;
$0.110575 per share for November 2014 to holders of record on November 28, 2014 with a payment date of December 18, 2014; and
$0.110600 per share for December 2014 to holders of record on December 31, 2014 with a payment date of January 22, 2015.
Revolving Credit Facility
On May 9, 2014 and May 29, 2014, we increased total commitments to our Revolving Credit Facility by $45,000 and $20,000, respectively. The lenders have extended total commitments of $857,500 as of June 30, 2014, which was increased to $877,500 in July 2014 (see "Recent Developments").

58


Debt Issuance 
On April 7, 2014, we issued $300,000 aggregate principal amount of senior unsecured notes that mature on July 15, 2019 (the “5.00% 2019 Notes”). Included in the issuance is $45,000 of Prospect Capital InterNotes® that were exchanged for the 5.00% 2019 Notes. The 5.00% 2019 Notes bear interest at a rate of 5.00% per year, payable semi-annually on January 15 and July 15 of each year, beginning July 15, 2014. Total proceeds from the issuance of the 5.00% 2019 Notes, net of underwriting discounts and offering costs, were $250,775.
On April 11, 2014, we issued $400,000 aggregate principal amount of senior convertible notes that mature on April 15, 2020 (the “2020 Notes”), unless previously converted or repurchased in accordance with their terms. The 2020 Notes bear interest at a rate of 4.75% per year, payable semi-annually on April 15 and October 15 each year, beginning October 15, 2014. Total proceeds from the issuance of the 2020 Notes, net of underwriting discounts and offering costs, were $387,500.
During the three months ended June 30, 2014, we issued $66,554 aggregate principal amount of our Prospect Capital InterNotes® for net proceeds of $65,251. These notes were issued with stated interest rates ranging from 3.75% to 6.25% with a weighted average interest rate of 5.03%. These notes mature between April 15, 2018 and May 15, 2039.
Tenor at
Origination
(in years)
 
Principal
Amount
 
Interest
Rate Range
 
Weighted
Average
Interest Rate
 
Maturity Date Range
4
 
$
8,759

 
3.75%
 
3.75
%
 
April 15, 2018 – May 15, 2018
5
 
21,950

 
4.25%–4.75%
 
4.48
%
 
April 15, 2019 – May 15, 2019
7
 
15,182

 
5.25%
 
5.25
%
 
April 15, 2021 – May 15, 2021
10
 
10,159

 
5.75%
 
5.75
%
 
April 15, 2024 – May 15, 2024
25
 
10,504

 
6.25%
 
6.25
%
 
April 15, 2039 – May 15, 2039
 
 
$
66,554

 
 
 
 
 
 
Investment Holdings
As of June 30, 2014, we continue to pursue our investment strategy. At June 30, 2014, approximately $6,253,739, or 172.8%, of our net assets are invested in 143 long-term portfolio investments and CLOs.
During the year ended June 30, 2014, we originated $2,952,456 of new investments, primarily composed of $1,585,869 of debt and equity financing to non-controlled investments, $913,094 of debt and equity financing to controlled investments, and $453,493 of subordinated notes in CLOs. Our origination efforts are focused primarily on debt and equity financing to controlled investments and secured lending to non-control investments, to reduce the risk in the portfolio, investing primarily in first lien loans, and subordinated notes in CLOs, though we also continue to close select junior debt and equity investments. Our annualized current yield was 13.6% and 12.1% as of June 30, 2013 and June 30, 2014, respectively, across all performing interest bearing investments. The decrease in our current yield is primarily the result of originations at lower rates than our average existing portfolio yield. Monetization of equity positions that we hold and loans on non-accrual status are not included in this yield calculation. In many of our portfolio companies we hold equity positions, ranging from minority interests to majority stakes, which we expect over time to contribute to our investment returns. Some of these equity positions include features such as contractual minimum internal rates of returns, preferred distributions, flip structures and other features expected to generate additional investment returns, as well as contractual protections and preferences over junior equity, in addition to the yield and security offered by our cash flow and collateral debt protections.
We are a non-diversified company within the meaning of the 1940 Act. As required by the 1940 Act, we classify our investments by level of control. As defined in the 1940 Act, "Control Investments" are those where there is the ability or power to exercise a controlling influence over the management or policies of a company. Control is generally deemed to exist when a company or individual possesses or has the right to acquire within 60 days or less, a beneficial ownership of 25% or more of the voting securities of an investee company. Under the 1940 Act, "Affiliate Investments" are defined by a lesser degree of influence and are deemed to exist through the possession outright or via the right to acquire within 60 days or less, beneficial ownership of 5% or more of the outstanding voting securities of another person. "Non-Control/Non-Affiliate Investments" are those that are neither Control Investments nor Affiliate Investments.

59


As of June 30, 2014, we own controlling interests in AMU Holdings Inc.; APH Property Holdings, LLC; Arctic Oilfield Equipment USA, Inc.; ARRM Services, Inc. (f/k/a ARRM Holdings Inc.); AWC, LLC; BXC Company, Inc. (f/k/a BXC Holding Company); CCPI Holdings Inc.; CP Holdings of Delaware LLC; Credit Central Holdings of Delaware, LLC; Echelon Aviation LLC; Energy Solutions Holdings Inc. (f/k/a Gas Solutions Holdings, Inc.); First Tower Holdings of Delaware LLC; Gulf Coast Machine & Supply Company; Harbortouch Holdings of Delaware Inc.; The Healing Staff, Inc.; Manx Energy, Inc.; MITY Holdings of Delaware Inc.; Nationwide Acceptance Holdings LLC; NMMB Holdings, Inc.; NPH Property Holdings, LLC; R-V Industries, Inc.; STI Holding, Inc.; UPH Property Holdings, LLC; Valley Electric Holdings I, Inc.; and Wolf Energy Holdings Inc. We also own an affiliated interest in BNN Holdings Corp. (f/k/a Biotronic NeuroNetwork).
The following shows the composition of our investment portfolio by level of control as of June 30, 2014 and June 30, 2013:
 
June 30, 2014
 
June 30, 2013
Level of Control
Cost
% of Portfolio
Fair Value
% of Portfolio
 
Cost
% of Portfolio
Fair Value
% of Portfolio
Control Investments
$
1,719,242

27.0
%
$
1,640,454

26.2
%
 
$
830,151

19.5
%
$
811,634

19.5
%
Affiliate Investments
31,829

0.5
%
32,121

0.5
%
 
49,189

1.2
%
42,443

1.0
%
Non-Control/Non-Affiliate Investments
4,620,451

72.5
%
4,581,164

73.3
%
 
3,376,438

79.3
%
3,318,775

79.5
%
Total Investments
$
6,371,522

100.0
%
$
6,253,739

100.0
%
 
$
4,255,778

100.0
%
$
4,172,852

100.0
%
The following shows the composition of our investment portfolio by type of investment as of June 30, 2014 and June 30, 2013:
 
June 30, 2014
 
June 30, 2013
Type of Investment
Cost
% of Portfolio
Fair Value
% of Portfolio
 
Cost
% of Portfolio
Fair Value
% of Portfolio
Revolving Line of Credit
$
3,445

0.1
%
$
2,786

%
 
$
9,238

0.2
%
$
8,729

0.2
%
Senior Secured Debt
3,578,339

56.2
%
3,514,198

56.2
%
 
2,262,327

53.1
%
2,207,091

52.8
%
Subordinated Secured Debt
1,272,275

20.0
%
1,200,221

19.2
%
 
1,062,386

25.0
%
1,024,901

24.6
%
Subordinated Unsecured Debt
85,531

1.3
%
85,531

1.4
%
 
88,470

2.1
%
88,827

2.1
%
Small Business Whole Loans
4,637

0.1
%
4,252

0.1
%
 

%

%
CLO Debt
28,118

0.4
%
33,199

0.5
%
 
27,667

0.7
%
28,589

0.7
%
CLO Residual Interest
1,044,656

16.4
%
1,093,985

17.5
%
 
660,619

15.5
%
658,086

15.8
%
Preferred Stock
80,096

1.3
%
10,696

0.2
%
 
25,016

0.6
%
14,742

0.4
%
Common Stock
84,768

1.3
%
80,153

1.3
%
 
34,629

0.8
%
47,083

1.1
%
Membership Interest
187,384

2.9
%
217,763

3.5
%
 
83,265

1.9
%
61,903

1.5
%
Net Profits Interest

%
213

%
 

%
520

%
Net Revenue Interest

%

%
 

%
20,439

0.5
%
Escrow Receivable

%
1,589

%
 

%
4,662

0.1
%
Warrants
2,273

%
9,153

0.1
%
 
2,161

0.1
%
7,280

0.2
%
Total Investments
$
6,371,522

100.0
%
$
6,253,739

100.0
%
 
$
4,255,778

100.0
%
$
4,172,852

100.0
%

60


The following shows our investments in interest bearing securities by type of investment as of June 30, 2014 and June 30, 2013:
 
June 30, 2014
 
June 30, 2013
Type of Investment
Cost
% of Portfolio
Fair Value
% of Portfolio
 
Cost
% of Portfolio
Fair Value
% of Portfolio
First Lien
$
3,581,784

59.5
%
$
3,516,984

59.3
%
 
$
2,271,565

55.3
%
$
2,215,820

55.2
%
Second Lien
1,272,275

21.1
%
1,200,221

20.2
%
 
1,062,386

25.8
%
1,024,901

25.5
%
Unsecured
85,531

1.4
%
85,531

1.4
%
 
88,470

2.2
%
88,827

2.2
%
Small Business Whole Loans
4,637

0.1
%
4,252

0.1
%
 

%

%
CLO Debt
28,118

0.5
%
33,199

0.6
%
 
27,667

0.7
%
28,589

0.7
%
CLO Residual Interest
1,044,656

17.4
%
1,093,985

18.4
%
 
660,619

16.0
%
658,086

16.4
%
Total Debt Investments
$
6,017,001

100.0
%
$
5,934,172

100.0
%
 
$
4,110,707

100.0
%
$
4,016,223

100.0
%
The following shows the composition of our investment portfolio by geographic location as of June 30, 2014 and June 30, 2013:
 
June 30, 2014
 
June 30, 2013
Geographic Location
Cost
% of Portfolio
Fair Value
% of Portfolio
 
Cost
% of Portfolio
Fair Value
% of Portfolio
Canada
$
15,000

0.2
%
$
15,000

0.2
%
 
$
165,000

3.9
%
$
165,000

4.0
%
Cayman Islands
1,072,774

16.8
%
1,127,184

18.0
%
 
688,286

16.2
%
686,675

16.5
%
France
10,170

0.2
%
10,339

0.2
%
 

%

%
Ireland

%

%
 
14,927

0.4
%
15,000

0.4
%
Midwest US
787,482

12.4
%
753,543

12.0
%
 
565,239

13.3
%
531,934

12.7
%
Northeast US
1,224,403

19.2
%
1,181,533

18.9
%
 
522,759

12.2
%
536,300

12.8
%
Puerto Rico
41,307

0.7
%
36,452

0.6
%
 
41,352

1.0
%
41,352

1.0
%
Southeast US
1,491,554

23.4
%
1,461,516

23.4
%
 
1,124,119

26.4
%
1,098,996

26.3
%
Southwest US
759,630

11.9
%
737,271

11.8
%
 
459,944

10.8
%
445,411

10.7
%
Western US
969,202

15.2
%
930,901

14.9
%
 
674,152

15.8
%
652,184

15.6
%
Total Investments
$
6,371,522

100.0
%
$
6,253,739

100.0
%
 
$
4,255,778

100.0
%
$
4,172,852

100.0
%

61


The following shows the composition of our investment portfolio by industry as of June 30, 2014 and June 30, 2013:
 
June 30, 2014
 
June 30, 2013
Industry
Cost
% of Portfolio
Fair Value
% of Portfolio
 
Cost
% of Portfolio
Fair Value
% of Portfolio
Aerospace & Defense
$
102,803

1.6
%
$
102,967

1.6
%
 
$
56

%
$

%
Auto Finance
11,139

0.2
%
11,139

0.2
%
 
10,914

0.3
%
10,417

0.2
%
Automobile
22,296

0.4
%
22,452

0.4
%
 
12,300

0.3
%
12,500

0.3
%
Biotechnology

%

%
 

%
14

%
Business Services
598,940

9.4
%
611,286

9.8
%
 
180,793

4.2
%
179,544

4.3
%
Chemicals
19,648

0.3
%
19,713

0.3
%
 
28,364

0.7
%
28,648